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  • NASA’s InSight lander may have just captured a ‘Marsquake’ for the first time

    NASA’s InSight lander may have just captured a ‘Marsquake’ for the first timeNASA's Mars rovers have provided breathtaking images from the surface of Mars for many years, but listening to Mars is a whole other story. The InSight lander, which touched down on Mars in late 2018, is designed to listen closely to the inner workings of the planet, and it may have just nailed a huge milestone.In a new blog post, NASA reveals what appears to be a recording of audio from the first Marsquake observed by the lander. It's a small step in a long road ahead for InSight, but it's an exciting development in a mission that has seen more than its fair share of trouble.You'll remember that back in March, NASA was faced with a huge hurdle to overcome when the InSight's drilling tool failed to drill deep enough into the Martian surface. The instrument came up well short of the intended depth to be drilled, but the robot has additional observational tools at its disposal as well.In the video below you'll hear the high-pitched whine of, well, something going on near the InSight. Scientists believe it to be evidence of the first Marsquake observed by mankind, but they're still digging into the data in order to confirm that notion.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLBP-5KoSCc"InSight's first readings carry on the science that began with NASA's Apollo missions," InSight Principal Investigator Bruce Banerdt said in a statement. "We've been collecting background noise up until now, but this first event officially kicks off a new field: Martian seismology!"The rumblings were detected by the InSight lander's SEIS (Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure) instrument, which the robot placed on the planet's surface last year. InSight is currently less than six months into its two-year primary mission, so we can expect to see many additional discoveries in the coming months.


  • Samsung's Reputation Founders on Rush for Lead in Folding Phones

    Samsung's Reputation Founders on Rush for Lead in Folding PhonesSamsung Electronics Co. on Tuesday scrapped what was to have been a crowning achievement, the launch of the world’s first mass-produced foldable smartphone. Instead of trumpeting its April 26 return to the forefront of global consumer electronics, the tech giant is now investigating how test versions of the $1,980 Galaxy Fold developed problems -- including screen failures -- after mere days of use.


  • Canada oil sands CO2 emissions hugely underestimated: study

    Canada oil sands CO2 emissions hugely underestimated: studyCanada's oil sands CO2 emissions are significantly higher than indicated by industry data collected using internationally recommended methods, according to a study published Tuesday. Environment Canada scientists flying over the region took atmospheric measurements and found CO2 emission intensities up to 123 percent higher than current estimates. "This leads to 64 percent higher annual GHG emissions from surface mining operations, and 30 percent higher overall oil sands GHG emissions (17 Mt) compared to that reported by industry, despite emissions reporting which uses the most up to date and recommended bottom-up approaches," said the study, referring to greenhouse gases.


  • Does Southern Cross Electrical Engineering Limited's (ASX:SXE) P/E Ratio Signal A Buying Opportunity?

    Does Southern Cross Electrical Engineering Limited's (ASX:SXE) P/E Ratio Signal A Buying Opportunity?This article is for investors who would like to improve their understanding of price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). We'll look at Southern Cross Electrical Engineering Limited's (ASX:SXE) P/E ratio and reflect on what it tells us...


  • AbbVie's Skyrizi drug to treat psoriasis wins U.S. approval

    AbbVie's Skyrizi drug to treat psoriasis wins U.S. approvalAbbVie Inc said on Tuesday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved its Skyrizi drug as a treatment for plaque psoriasis at a time when its blockbuster psoriasis drug, Humira, faces patent pressures. Plaque psoriasis is the most common form of psoriasis, a chronic skin condition. The approval of Skyrizi, an injectable drug, is based on results from AbbVie's global Phase 3 psoriasis program, which assessed the safety and efficacy of the drug in adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.


  • Trump Meets Twitter’s Dorsey After Fuming Over ‘Political Games’

    Trump Meets Twitter’s Dorsey After Fuming Over ‘Political Games’Trump tweeted that he had a “great meeting” with Dorsey and that he wants to keep an “open dialogue” with the tech executive. “Thank you for the time,” Dorsey said in a tweeted response. “Twitter is here to serve the entire public conversation, and we intend to make it healthier and more civil.


  • John McAfee Vows to Unmask Bitcoin’s Satoshi Nakamoto

    John McAfee Vows to Unmask Bitcoin’s Satoshi NakamotoAfter previously telling Bloomberg he would expose Nakamoto “within a week,” he backed off the plan. McAfee said Tuesday on Twitter the controversy could hurt his efforts to fight an extradition to the U.S. The background of Nakamoto -- a pseudonym that is thought to refer to a person or group of people -- has been fiercely debated for years, with a long list of discredited theories fueling suspicion Bitcoin’s pioneer is probably dead.


  • Otherworldly: Sounds of first 'Marsquake' detected

    Otherworldly: Sounds of first 'Marsquake' detectedThe first "Marsquake" has been detected. The finding "officially kicks off a new field: Martian seismology!," said Bruce Banerdt of NASA.


  • Texas Instruments' Forecast Stokes Optimism for a Chip Revival

    Texas Instruments' Forecast Stokes Optimism for a Chip RevivalOn average, analysts predicted profit of $1.24 a share and sales of $3.66 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The company’s shares rallied after the initial numbers were released, but lost ground later during a conference call, when Chief Financial Officer Rafael Lizardi offered a more subdued outlook. It happens every few years because of the way the industry works,” Lizardi said in an interview.


  • The Initial Thoughts That Went Through My Mind After My Cancer Diagnosis

    The Initial Thoughts That Went Through My Mind After My Cancer DiagnosisThe author shares the emotions she felt after her multiple myeloma diagnosis.


  • 'Marsquake' detected for first time, Nasa says

    'Marsquake' detected for first time, Nasa saysNasa has detected a probable "Marsquake" for the first time. The suspected seismic event on the Red Planet was recorded using silicon sensors developed in the UK. A dome-shaped apparatus known as Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure [SEIS] landed on Mars last year equipped with the sensors, which were built with £4 million in funding from the UK Space Agency Nasa said the measuring of the quake, which occurred on April 6, marked the "birth of a new discipline - Martian seismology". Chris Skidmore, the science minister, said it was a "testament to the UK’s world leading science and engineering space sector". Professor Tom Pike of Imperial College London, leading the UK contribution, said: "This is what we were all waiting for, the first quivering of the planet picked up by our sensors. Our first investigation of the interior of another planet is now underway." Mars is not nearly as geologically active as Earth and, like our moon, lacks tectonic plates. Nasa's InSight lander's domed wind and thermal shield which covers a seismometer Credit: Nasa But thousands of "moonquakes" were detected on the lunar surface between 1969 and 1977 using equipment installed there by Nasa's Apollo missions. The French space agency Cnes, which operates SEIS, said there had been a "weak but distinct seismic signal" on Mars which could shed light on the ancient origins of Earth's neighbour. It added: "We've waited for our first Martian quake for months." The tremor was so faint that an earthquake of the same magnitude in southern California would be virtually lost among the dozens of tiny seismological events that occur there every day, Nasa said.


  • SoftBank to Consider Acquiring 5% Stake in Wirecard

    SoftBank to Consider Acquiring 5% Stake in WirecardSoftBank has hired financial advisers and is working on a deal to acquire bonds that can be converted into Wirecard shares, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the information is private. A representative for Tokyo-based SoftBank declined to comment. A spokeswoman for Munich-based Wirecard didn’t respond to emails and phone calls requesting comment after business hours.


  • Is Baby Powder Safe to Use? Depends on What’s in It

    Is Baby Powder Safe to Use? Depends on What’s in ItThere are better ways to smooth a baby's bottom, experts warn.


  • If You've Tried to Hide Your Diabetes Supplies, You Might Relate to James Norton's Tricks

    If You've Tried to Hide Your Diabetes Supplies, You Might Relate to James Norton's TricksBritish actor James Norton shares how he hides his diabetes when he is onstage or filming a TV show or movie.


  • Libyan forces push back Haftar's troops south of Tripoli: witnesses

    Libyan forces push back Haftar's troops south of Tripoli: witnessesThe town of Aziziya was fully under the control of the Tripoli forces, with shops reopening after days of fighting, a Reuters team at the scene said. Haftar's Libyan National Army (LNA), which is allied to a rival government in eastern Libya, mounted an offensive on Tripoli almost three weeks ago but despite heavy fighting last week it has failed to breach the city's southern defenses. In recent days, forces backing the Tripoli administration have pushed back the LNA in some areas.


  • NASA probe records first likely 'marsquake' detected on red planet

    NASA probe records first likely 'marsquake' detected on red planetNASA's robotic probe InSight has detected and measured what scientists believe to be a "marsquake," marking the first time a likely seismological tremor has been recorded on another planet, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California reported on Tuesday. The breakthrough came five months after InSight, the first spacecraft designed specifically to study the deep interior of a distant world, touched down on the surface of Mars to begin its two-year seismological mission on the red planet. The faint rumble characterized by JPL scientists as a likely marsquake was recorded on April 6, the lander's 128th Martian day, or sol.


  • SoFi Is in Talks With Qatar for $500 Million Funding Round

    SoFi Is in Talks With Qatar for $500 Million Funding RoundThe new round, which could close as soon as this week, is said to value the startup at an amount similar to the $4.3 billion valuation of its 2017 funding round, led by Silver Lake. A SoFi spokeswoman declined to comment. San Francisco-based SoFi has launched a number of new products in recent years, but it has also seen a slew of management changes, increased competition and a slowdown in its main business: lending.


  • eBay Issues Upbeat Profit, Revenue Forecast; Shares Jump

    eBay Issues Upbeat Profit, Revenue Forecast; Shares JumpAs EBay struggles to compete with Amazon.com Inc., Elliott Management Corp. and Starboard Value acquired stakes in the company and agitated for change. Elliott proposed a five-point plan to improve EBay’s performance, including the possible sale of tickets marketplace StubHub and its Classified Group. EBay shares have gained 30 percent this year since the investors jumped in.


  • Can Diet and Exercise Actually Improve PCOS Symptoms?

    Can Diet and Exercise Actually Improve PCOS Symptoms?Here’s what experts know so far.


  • Yes, I Can Eat That: How to Deal With the Diabetes 'Food Police'

    Yes, I Can Eat That: How to Deal With the Diabetes 'Food Police'If someone asks if you can eat a certain food because you have diabetes, here are three possible ways to respond.


  • SpaceIL’s lunar lander crashed because of ‘manual command’

    SpaceIL’s lunar lander crashed because of ‘manual command’It's now been a couple of weeks since Israel's first attempt to land on the Moon was met with disaster at the last possible moment. The SpaceIL Beresheet lander crashed onto the Moon after what appeared to be some kind of engine failure in the final moments of approach, but new information is coming to light that suggests the engine may have had a good reason for shutting down.A recent statement from SpaceIL offers a bit more context for the way the mission came to its unfortunate end, though plenty of questions remain."According to preliminary investigation of the Israeli spacecraft Beresheet's landing maneuver, it appears that a manual command was entered into the spacecraft's computer," the statement reads. "This led to a chain reaction in the spacecraft, during which the main engine switched off, which prevented it from activating further."https://twitter.com/SpaceBrendan/status/1118523521234292738During the live stream of the spacecraft's final descent all appeared to be going well up until the engine shut down. The quick-thinking SpaceIL engineers issued a command to the spacecraft to restart the engine and it successfully fired them back up, but the lander was already plummeting to the lunar surface and was unable to recover.It was a less-than-stellar conclusion to Israel's first attempt to land a spacecraft on the Moon, but SpaceIL isn't taking the defeat lying down. The company is already working on what it has called "Beresheet 2.0" and fully intends on successfully landing a spacecraft on the Moon sooner rather than later. Details regarding that mission and its eventual launch date have yet to be determined.


  • Nintendo's Big Rally on China Prospects Hasn't Scared Off Shorts

    Nintendo's Big Rally on China Prospects Hasn't Scared Off ShortsNintendo’s stock has rallied 27 percent this year, the best start since 2015. Hedge funds even added to those positions last Friday -- the day Nintendo shares rallied 15 percent as China gave a nod to Switch game sales in the country. The clash raises the stakes for Thursday, when rookie President Shuntaro Furukawa will unveil financial results for the last fiscal year and guidance for the coming one.


  • Algerian state energy company Sonatrach's CEO sacked: state TV

    Algerian state energy company Sonatrach's CEO sacked: state TVThe interim president, Abdelkader Bensalah, appointed Sonatrach's head of production and exploration, Rachid Hachichi, to replace Kaddour, state TV reported. The move casts doubts on whether deals Sonatrach had been working on will go ahead, such as plans to set up a trading joint venture with foreign firms. Only last week, Kaddour, a U.S.-trained engineer, had said the company would hold talks this week with U.S company Chevron Corp, which last week agreed to buy Anadarko, to discuss a shale gas and oil production partnership Kaddour had been close to former President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, who had put him in charge of overhauling Sonatrach in March 2017 after years of management upheaval, fraud scandals and red tape had deterred foreign investors.


  • Mars lander picks up what's likely 1st detected marsquake

    Mars lander picks up what's likely 1st detected marsquakeCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA's InSight lander has picked up a gentle rumble at Mars, believed to be the first marsquake ever detected.


  • Woman Missing for 5 Days Found Alive in Wrecked Car After Vanishing During Trip to Post Office

    Woman Missing for 5 Days Found Alive in Wrecked Car After Vanishing During Trip to Post OfficeWoman Missing for 5 Days Found Alive in Wrecked Car


  • Russia's Doomsday Submarines Are Here (Armed with Nuclear Robot Torpedoes)

    Russia's Doomsday Submarines Are Here (Armed with Nuclear Robot Torpedoes)Russian has launched the first of several submarines designed to carry thermonuclear-armed robot torpedoes.The Belgorod, recently launched from the Sevmash shipyard in northern Russia, is designed to carry the Status-6 Poseidon, an 80-foot-long robot sub with intercontinental range and armed with a 100-megaton warhead that to create a tsunami that will bury enemy coastal cities.“The new submarine would be able to carry six strategic underwater drones,” reported Russian news agency TASS. Russian President Vladimir Putin reportedly watched the launch over a special TV link.In addition to carrying an exotic weapon, the Belgorod has an exotic history. The vessel was laid down in 1992 as a giant Oscar II-class nuclear submarine -- the same as the doomed sub Kursk. Construction stopped in 1997 due to lack of funds, but work restarted in the 2010s as Project 09852.Russia’s United Shipbuilding Corporation initially announced that the revised design was supposed to be a research vessel equipped with drones for underwater exploration as well as search and rescue, according to TASS. Russian defense analysts suggested that the Belgorod would a stretched Oscar II, becoming the largest Russian submarine afloat, with a length of 184 meters (604 feet).


  • Even light rain increases your risk of a deadly car crash

    Even light rain increases your risk of a deadly car crashWASHINGTON (AP) — Even light rain significantly increases your risk of a fatal car crash, a new study finds.


  • We've Found the First Real Traces of "Marsquakes"

    We've Found the First Real Traces of "Marsquakes"Working together, two space agencies find evidence that has eluded scientists for years.


  • Kidney-Cancer Market: Good for Patients, Hard for Investors

    Kidney-Cancer Market: Good for Patients, Hard for InvestorsDrugmakers battle for patients.


  • Space ETFs: Invest in the Final Frontier

    Space ETFs: Invest in the Final FrontierYou can now explore the final frontier and profit from the growing space economy with these ETFs.


  • FDA Approves First Medical Device to Treat ADHD in Kids

    FDA Approves First Medical Device to Treat ADHD in KidsParents of kids with ADHD now have a non-drug option to consider for their child's treatment.


  • Google Spinoff’s Drone Delivery Business First to Get FAA Approval

    Google Spinoff’s Drone Delivery Business First to Get FAA ApprovalThe subsidiary, Wing Aviation LLC, now has the same certifications that smaller airlines receive from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and the Department of Transportation. It plans to begin routine deliveries of small consumer items in two rural communities in Virginia within months, the company said. “It’s an exciting moment for us to have earned the FAA’s approval to actually run a business with our technology,” Wing Chief Executive Officer James Ryan Burgess said in an interview.


  • Could China Find Japan's Lost F-35 and Steal Its Secrets? The U.S. Says No.

    Could China Find Japan's Lost F-35 and Steal Its Secrets? The U.S. Says No.The American and Japanese governments are marshaling forces to recover the missing stealth jet.


  • Greenland's Ice Sheet Was Growing. Now It's in a Terrifying Decline

    Greenland's Ice Sheet Was Growing. Now It's in a Terrifying DeclineGreenland's ice sheet is melting six times faster than it was in the 1980s. And all that meltwater is directly raising sea levels.That's all according to a new study, published yesterday (April 22) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, that carefully reconstructs the behavior of the ice sheet in the decades before modern measurement tools became available. Scientists already knew that there was a lot more ice on Greenland in the 1970s and 1980s. And they've had precise measurements of the increase in melting since the 1990s. Now they know just how dramatically things have changed in the last 46 years."When you look at several decades, it is best to sit back in your chair before looking at the results, because it is a bit scary to see how fast it is changing," University of California, Irvine, glaciologist Eric Rignot, a co-author of the study, said in a statement. [Image Gallery: Greenland's Melting Glaciers]Greenland is just one island. But its ice sheet has the potential to transform the entire planet. The Greenland ice sheet has existed for 2.4 million years and is 2.1 miles (3.4 kilometers) thick at its deepest point. The whole thing weighs about half as much as Earth's whole atmosphere, or 6 quintillion -- or 6 with 18 zeros after it -- lbs. (2.7 quintillion kilograms). If it melted entirely, sea levels would rise by 24.3 feet (7.4 meters).In the 21st century, scientists use laser measurements of the height of the ice, measurements of the ice sheet's total gravity and satellite photos to gauge changes in ice thickness. That's how they know that the sheet is melting four times faster now than it was in 2003, as Live Science previously reported.To extend that record further into the past, the researchers divided Greenland into 260 "basins" of ice, which they studied individually using a combination of direct measurements of ice changes in satellite photos and sophisticated computer models of ice behavior. They found that between 1972 and 1980, Greenland actually gained roughly 100 trillion lbs. (47 trillion kg) of ice per year. The real mass loss, they found, started in the 1980s. Between 1980 and 1990, the island lost in the ballpark of 112 trillion lbs. (51 trillion kg) of ice per year. Between 1990 and 2000, it lost about 90 trillion lbs. (41 trillion kg) per year.Then, in the 2000s, things dramatically accelerated.Between 2000 and 2010, Greenland lost about 412 trillion lbs. (187 trillion kg) of ice per year. Between 2010 and 2018, the ice sheet lost roughly 631 trillion lbs. (286 trillion kilograms) of ice per year.Those numbers make concrete what researchers and inhabitants of Greenland already knew: that the island is changing and its ancient glaciers are receding at an alarming rate. The dramatic uptick in ice loss in the last two decades coincides with a similar surge in atmospheric greenhouse gases and warming. As Live Science reported earlier this year, nine of the 10 warmest winters on record have happened since 2005.A chart from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows the drastic increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide measured in Hawaii over the course of the last several decades. NOAAWhat does this all mean for the future of the ice sheet, as well as global sea levels? As the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded, that will depend primarily on what humans do next. * The Coldest Places on Earth * The 8 Hottest Places on Earth * 10 Tsunamis That Changed HistoryOriginally published on Live Science.


  • Scientists Discover Gene Mutation That Prevents Obesity

    Scientists Discover Gene Mutation That Prevents ObesityScientists Find Gene Mutation That Mutes Appetite


  • An 11-Year-Old Girl Died From an Allergic Reaction to Toothpaste

    An 11-Year-Old Girl Died From an Allergic Reaction to ToothpasteHere's what parents need to know.


  • Putin views launch of new submarine to carry nuclear drones

    Putin views launch of new submarine to carry nuclear dronesMOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin has watched the launch of a new submarine intended to carry prospective underwater nuclear drones — a doomsday weapon capable of causing a devastating tsunami.


  • Scouted: 8 Ways to Make Surviving Allergy Season a (Pollen-Free) Breeze

    Scouted: 8 Ways to Make Surviving Allergy Season a (Pollen-Free) BreezeFlowers are blooming, the sun is shining, and noses are running. It’s officially allergy season and besides taking OTC allergy medication or nasal sprays, there’s only so much you can do to survive. But we’ve rounded up a list of a few things that you can outfit yourself with so that you can kiss those days of itchy eyes and sneezing goodbye.Large Room Air Purifier, $399 from Pure Company: A great way to keep allergies at bay while you’re inside is to invest in an air purifier. When you’re outside, you’re collecting pollen, dust, and debris that you then bring inside. An air purifier can help keep the air inside your home allergen-free. This one has “a True HEPA Filter [that] removes invisible pollutants and bacteria as small as 0.3 microns,” according to the brand’s site. EO Hand Sanitizer Spray in Organic French Lavender, $20 for a 6-pack on Amazon: If you can’t readily wash your hands, like getting off the subway or before eating lunch, having a good hand sanitizer with you can help get rid of all the lingering germs. A sanitizing spray is a travel-friendly alternative to the liquidy gels that tend to get everywhere and dry your hands.Cariloha Ultra Plush Bamboo Bathrobe, $120 on Amazon: When allergy season is in full swing, sometimes you can’t avoid succumbing to the stuffiness. So instead of trying to compete with it, embrace it. Wrap yourself in a bathrobe that has odor- and allergy-resistant properties and will help you feel better, at least in spirit.Sunny Health & Fitness Mini Stepper, $44 from Amazon: You won’t have to miss a day of exercise if you take a day off from working out outdoors when the pollen count is extremely high. Something like this compact mini stepper allows you to get the workout you’d normally get from running outdoors or heading to the gym but without the risk of exposing yourself to a swath of allergens in the air.* * *Sponsored by DiscountFilters.com* * *The air quality in your home is one of its most important features, especially for anyone suffering from seasonal allergies. DiscountFilters is here to help: They’re offering exclusive deals for Daily Beast readers on these air purifier and filter products—just in time for allergy season.The AiRx HEPA & Carbon Room Air Purifier is one way to enhance the air quality in any space — and a perfect addition to any home this spring. The quiet purifier and ionizer runs a HEPA filter designed to remove particles as small as .3 microns. And three fan speeds let you customize your filtering — there’s even a sleep mode for nighttime operation. Use code BEAST at checkout to get 20% off your purchase when you buy the AiRx Purifier and a replacement filter together. On top of that, you can get 15% off any furnace filter on DiscountFilter’s site right now. Using clean filters have the potential to reduce your energy costs and may even help extend the lifetime of your heating system.  Use code POLLEN to apply the discount. Both discount offers expire on May 31, 2019. * * *Coop Home Goods Hypoallergenic Certipur Memory Foam Pillow, $60 on Amazon: Making sure your soft fabrics are allergen-free is a great start, but you should consider the surfaces you’re spending the most time on. Your pillow can be a harbinger of allergenic debris, so getting a hypoallergenic one can help cut down on waking up feeling congested.The Breeze Comforter, $210 from Buffy: Speaking of spending time in bed, a hypoallergenic comforter is a good idea too. Fabric can soak up a ton of gunk from the air, but something that is hypoallergenic tends to be resistant to microbes and allergens. Plus, this one is made from eucalyptus so it’s breathable and will help keep you cool.Mer-Sea & Co. Shower Bomb, $7 from Anthropologie: One of the best ways to get rid of the pollen you’re carrying around on you is to take a nice, hot shower. Go one step further and turn your shower into a congestion reliever with an effervescent shower fizz that will give you a burst of aromatherapy and help with that stuffy nose.Scouted is internet shopping with a pulse. Follow us on Twitter and sign up for our newsletter for even more recommendations and exclusive content. Please note that if you buy something featured in one of our posts, The Daily Beast may collect a share of sales.Read more at The Daily Beast.


  • Elon Musk's Chipmaking Claims Don't Match the Reality

    Elon Musk's Chipmaking Claims Don't Match the RealityOn Monday he took a swipe at semiconductors, arguing that his own engineers have created technology that puts chipmakers’ efforts in the shade. Musk also knocked other approaches to building systems that will make human drivers redundant and made claims about the way Tesla is bucking conventional wisdom to tackle one of the most complex engineering problems today. Here is a fact-check of the technology behind driverless cars.


  • Elon Musk's Chipmaking Claims Don't Match the Reality

    Elon Musk's Chipmaking Claims Don't Match the RealityOn Monday he took a swipe at semiconductors, arguing that his own engineers have created technology that puts chipmakers’ efforts in the shade. Musk also knocked other approaches to building systems that will make human drivers redundant and made claims about the way Tesla is bucking conventional wisdom to tackle one of the most complex engineering problems today. Here is a fact-check of the technology behind driverless cars.


  • 'Air bear' flight to Russian Arctic returns polar bear who drifted 400 miles south on ice

    'Air bear' flight to Russian Arctic returns polar bear who drifted 400 miles south on iceAn “air bear” helicopter flight has returned a polar bear to the Russian Arctic after he drifted more than 400 miles south on an ice floe. Fishermen ran into the two-year-old male bear last week near Tilichiki, an isolated village in the Kamchatka region on Russia's Pacific coast.  Since polar bears are not usually found in Kamchatka, it is believed that the marooned bear had floated in on a piece of ice from the neighbouring Chukotka region. He was nicknamed “Umka” after the playful polar bear from a Soviet cartoon. The ice and shores of the Chukchi Sea between Chukotka and Alaska are home to 3,000 polar bears, according to a 2018 study, the largest population of the world's largest land predator. They also live on the Bering Sea just to the south. But as sea ice melts further and faster due to global warming, polar bears are being seen more frequently outside their normal habitat.  A Russian military town on the Arctic island of Novaya Zemlya was "invaded" by polar bears in February. A study published on Tuesday said the release of methane and carbon dioxide from thawing permafrost will accelerate climate change. Taken into account with the loss of heat-deflecting ice, this will increase global warming by 5 per cent and add up to £54tn in economic consequences. Craters discovered in northern Russia in recent years are believed to mainly be caused by the explosion of methane hydrates amid rising temperatures.  Hungry after his journey, Umka was filmed wandering through Tilichiki and a nearby village, having swum across the bay between them. Locals fed him fish and four pounds of candy. “What a beauty!” one resident can be heard exclaiming in a video. The disoriented bear would not have been able to make his way home across hundreds of miles of coastline, however, and scientists feared he would not survive the relatively warm weather and uncustomary food supply in Kamchatka.  The sea ice there is generally too thin for polar bears to hunt seals on it.   “In Kamchatka, the feed base does not suit them. So most likely such guests will die,” Siberian Times quoted wildlife official Vladimir Gordienko as saying. The Kamchatka governor ordered the emergencies ministry to catch the creature and fly him back to Chukotka in a special operation that was almost like an Arctic version of Dumbo Drop. But Umka initially ran away from his would-be rescuers, and then the flight had to be postponed due to poor weather.  Specialists work to load the bear onto the helicopter Credit: Kamchat.info/The Siberian Times Once they finally departed on Monday, the sedated bear awoke in his cage mid-flight and was reportedly frightened by the loud thrumming of the motors in the Soviet-designed Mi-8 helicopter.  Upon disembarking on Cape Navarin in Chukotka, 450 miles to the north, a specialist armed with a shotgun pulled up the door of the cage, and Umka bounded out into the snowy landscape.  But experts expect such instances to occur more often as climate change amplifies the breakup of sea ice.  “The ice in the Bering Sea is unstable, and bears are being carried south with the ice floes,” scientist Anatoly Kochnev told the government newspaper. “There the ice breaks up, and they swim to the nearest shore.” Bears are not the only animals suffering. Chukotka was also where David Attenborough's new series Out Planet filmed walruses plunging to their deaths after they had been forced onto coastal cliffs by melting sea ice.


  • The Death of a Parent Affects Even Grown Children Psychologically and Physically

    The Death of a Parent Affects Even Grown Children Psychologically and PhysicallyGrief is both real and measurable. Scientists now know that the death of your father or mother will forever alter your brain chemistry and may also have physical effects.


  • Australia WWII ship sunk by Japanese submarine found

    Australia WWII ship sunk by Japanese submarine foundAn Australian freighter sunk by a Japanese submarine during World War II has been located "relatively intact" in waters off the country's southeast coast, archeologists said Tuesday. The SS Iron Crown was hit by a torpedo on June 4, 1942 while carting ore in waters off Australia's southern coastline near the state of Victoria. "Locating the wreck after 77 years of not knowing its final resting place will bring closure for relatives and family of those that were lost at sea, as well as for Australia's maritime community," Peter Harvey, an archeologist with Heritage Victoria, said.


  • Kohl's Surges on Deal to Expand Amazon Ties in Return Policy

    Kohl's Surges on Deal to Expand Amazon Ties in Return PolicyKohl’s has been getting cozier with Amazon in recent years, with the aim of drawing more new customers into its stores. “We expect this strategy to help lift traffic and drive” comparable sales at Kohl’s, said Randal Konik, an analyst at Jefferies. Kohl’s also issued a warrant to an Amazon investment arm to let it buy as many as 1.75 million shares of Kohl’s stock.


  • The 12 Most Recognizable Signs of Gluten Intolerance

    The 12 Most Recognizable Signs of Gluten IntoleranceUp to 13 percent of the U.S. population has trouble digesting gluten, even though they don't have celiac disease. Could you be one of them?


  • Weak first quarter seen for U.S. refiners, but brighter summer expected

    Weak first quarter seen for U.S. refiners, but brighter summer expectedU.S. independent refiners are expected to roll out lower than expected first-quarter profits after a spate of outages, weak gasoline margins and a surge in the price of Canadian oil, according to analysts. Major independent refiners cut production dramatically during the quarter, with some electing to undergo maintenance rather than produce barrels at a time when gasoline margins slumped. Several major U.S. refiners, including Valero Energy Corp, HollyFrontier Corp, and Marathon Petroleum Corp, are all expected to fall short of consensus estimates when they report results, according to Refinitiv Eikon's SmartEstimate model, which values more recent revisions from higher-ranked analysts.


  • The U.S. Is Seeing the Longest Flu Season in a Decade—Here's What You Need to Know

    The U.S. Is Seeing the Longest Flu Season in a Decade—Here's What You Need to KnowDon't put away that hand sanitizer just yet.


  • Teen activist says future has been stolen by climate change

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