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  • Mind-blowing images of space from the Cassini orbiter

    Mind-blowing images of space from the Cassini orbiterThe spacecraft has captured beautiful images of Saturn and its moons.


  • Trump's big EPA website change should make you furious

    Trump's big EPA website change should make you furiousYet another fear among scientists and climate activists has become reality in the era of Trump. Decades of research and data about carbon emissions, other greenhouse gases, and more was hidden from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website by the Trump administration late Friday as the sprawling climate change webpage goes under "review."  Adding insult to injury, this comes on the eve of the People's Climate March.  Climate change activists have been wringing their hands ever since Inauguration Day, fearing that the new administration would do something just like this. The EPA has been chipping away at climate change mentions on its website since January, but Friday's takedown is the biggest, and most disturbing step yet.  SEE ALSO: In ultimate insult, Trump rolls back EPA's climate policies from within the EPA The webpage, which has been in existence for more than 20 years, explained what climate change is, what caused it and how it affects your health, among other things. In contrast to what Trump and his EPA administrator, Scott Pruitt, have said about climate change (they don't believe it's man-made), the webpage notes many times how humans have contributed to climate change.  "Research indicates that natural causes do not explain most observed warming, especially warming since the mid-20th century. Rather, it is extremely likely that human activities have been the dominant cause of that warming," the webpage read, according to an archived version captured before Friday. Starting Friday evening, going to EPA.gov/climate and EPA.gov/climatechange sent visitors to a landing page that said, "This page is being updated." In an agency statement about the website changes, there's no mention of removing all the content, even if temporarily.  "The process, which involves updating language to reflect the approach of new leadership, is intended to ensure that the public can use the website to understand the agency's current efforts," the EPA's statement reads, adding in the last line that "content related to climate and regulation is also under review." At the very end of a Friday news dump: @EPA might take climate change information off its website pic.twitter.com/Gngh62R5sJ — Timothy Cama (@Timothy_Cama) April 28, 2017 While the climate landing page was down, certain climate-related sections could still be found through a Google search. For example, a section about climate indicators was still live as of Friday evening. "While it remains to be seen how information and information access will change as the EPA site is updated, it is concerning that this overhaul was not announced until the same day that pages like the Climate Change page, which serve as important public resources, were already becoming unavailable," said the Environmental Data and Governance Website Tracking Initiative, a nonprofit group closely tracking changes to climate information across the federal government, in a statement.  "The timing of this overhaul cuts off availability when access to trusted information about the science behind climate change will be necessary to enable a conversation about our changing climate," the group stated. Trump has made climate denying statements in the past, calling global warming a hoax. More recently he walked them back, claiming that climate change was naturally occurring and not man-made. Trump's EPA chief, Scott Pruitt, is a noted climate-change denier.  The administration is seeking to make deep cuts to the EPA's budget and personnel, potential involving thousands of layoffs and the gutting of its climate science programs, which could leave few qualified people left to update the climate science page in the next few years. The scientific findings presented on the EPA climate change website were used by many in the media and the scientific community to contradict claims Pruitt made in a CNBC interview on March 9, in which he said that carbon dioxide does not act as a "control knob," or thermostat, on the planet's climate:  "I think that measuring with precision human activity on the climate is something very challenging to do and there's tremendous disagreement about the degree of impact, so no, I would not agree that it's a primary contributor to the global warming that we see," Pruitt said. "But we don't know that yet, as far as... we need to continue the debate and continue the review and the analysis," he said.  On eve of #climatemarch, Trump EPA releases quiet, mumbling press release signaling censorship of climate change content from EPA website. https://t.co/MUxAIf5XMs — John Walke (@jwalkenrdc) April 28, 2017 The EPA's inspector general is investigating whether Pruitt's statement's violated agency policy because they departed so much from the agency's own scientific findings.  The EPA has a link back to an archived view of the site from before Trump took office on Jan. 19. That's exactly one day before Trump took over. But more recent archived versions of the site are available, such as this screenshot of the climate page from March 17. Earlier Friday, Trump signed an executive order that expands offshore drilling in the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans, something the Obama administration fought to curtail. The administration has been working to roll back Obama's other climate change programs, including the EPA's Clean Power Plan, which would restrict greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.  The website review may be aimed at bringing the site in line with such an agenda, but any editing of scientific information would run counter to the history of the site and the mission of the EPA.  Information about the website changes have been murky, with the administration's statement leaving much to be desired in terms of detail. There's no timeline on when the changes will be made either. Climate activists have already begun voicing their concerns on social media, and this is sure to fire them up as they ready for Saturday's big climate march.  Mashable science editor Andrew Freedman contributed reporting for this story. WATCH: Hero with a drone spots a shark circling below 3 oblivious surfers


  • Brazil's indigenous tribes protest against land theft

    Brazil's indigenous tribes protest against land theftBrasília (AFP) - Fed up with endless encroachment on their ancestral lands, leaders of Brazil's many indigenous tribes went to the capital Brasilia to speak out this week. "They're prejudiced," said Alvaro Tucano, one of the tribal members taking part in a week-long camp outside the government complex.


  • Scientists think Facebook and Elon Musk are way too optimistic about mind-reading tech

    Scientists think Facebook and Elon Musk are way too optimistic about mind-reading techNeuroscientists are skeptical of the timeframes Facebook and Neuralink have laid out for mind-reading tech


  • Pope Urges Solidarity and Compassion in 1st-Ever Papal TED Talk

    Pope Urges Solidarity and Compassion in 1st-Ever Papal TED TalkThe pope urged compassion alongside progress in a surprise TED Talk shown in Vancouver, British Columbia, yesterday (April 25). In the first-ever TED Talk by a pope, Pope Francis urged a science- and tech-heavy audience to cultivate love and tenderness. According to TED's international curator, Bruno Giussani, it took more than a year to arrange the talk.


  • Turkey purges 4,000 civil servants, bans TV dating programs

    Turkey purges 4,000 civil servants, bans TV dating programsISTANBUL (AP) — Turkey passed two new decrees Saturday — one that expelled more than 4,000 civil servants and another that banned television dating programs.


  • Scientists Don't Know What This New Celestial Phenomenon Is So They're Calling It Steve

    Scientists Don't Know What This New Celestial Phenomenon Is So They're Calling It SteveIt's a bird… it's a plane… it's Steve?


  • This Polymer Folds Itself Into Origami Structures

    This Polymer Folds Itself Into Origami StructuresUsing light and multiple layers of polymer film, the new method can be used by “anybody with PowerPoint and a projector,” according to researchers who developed it.


  • China to begin construction of manned space station in 2019

    China to begin construction of manned space station in 2019China will begin construction of a permanent manned space station in 2019 after carrying out a successful in-orbit refuelling from its Tianzhou-1 cargo spacecraft, officials leading the project said on Friday. The Tianzhou-1, China's first cargo spacecraft, launched on April 20 and completed the first of three planned docking attempts with the orbiting Tiangong-2 spacelab two days later, state media reported. The successful five-day refuelling, directed from technicians on Earth and completed on Thursday, is a key milestone toward China's plans to begin sending crews to a permanent space station by 2022.


  • Space: Trump's Least Controversial Frontier

    Space: Trump's Least Controversial FrontierThe first 100 days of Donald Trump’s presidency have been no less rife with controversy and political infighting than his campaign. As the new administration settled into the White House, it unleashed a torrent of new policy plans and executive orders for the public to debate, producing a flood of stories competing for the public’s attention. But one area in particular seems to have flown under the radar, prompting no outrage and little parsing from Trump’s critics: the nation’s space policy.


  • Where is MH370? Scientists Say They Have 'Credible Information' for Location

    Where is MH370? Scientists Say They Have 'Credible Information' for LocationIt is now more than three years since Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared, and there is growing evidence that the search authorities have been looking for the aircraft in the wrong place. An underwater search of a 120,000 square kilometer area of the Indian Ocean, off Western Australia, has so far failed to find any evidence of the crash site. Initial evidence on the aircraft flight path was through satellite data (SatCom) from Inmarsat.


  • Scientists develop an imaging technique for looking through concrete

    Scientists develop an imaging technique for looking through concreteScientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have developed imaging technology that lets them detect corrosion in steel structures, even when it’s encased in thick concrete.


  • Review: Coal terminal would boost global climate-warming gas

    Review: Coal terminal would boost global climate-warming gasSEATTLE (AP) — A coal-export terminal proposed in Washington state would increase cancer risks for some residents, make rail accidents more likely and add millions of metric tons of climate-changing greenhouse gas globally every year, according to an environmental study released Friday.


  • Here's What Happens When a Drone Falls On Your Head

    Here's What Happens When a Drone Falls On Your HeadHere's What Happens When a Drone Falls On Your Head


  • The perfect pant for concealed carry

    The perfect pant for concealed carryAllison Barrie finds a tactical (and practical) pair of pants for all women who want to look stylish while having a place to store their AR mag


  • How to fix India's burning issue: turn unwanted straw into bio-energy pellets

    How to fix India's burning issue: turn unwanted straw into bio-energy pelletsFarmers are setting fire to their straw and spreading air pollution across northern India.


  • 508-Million-Year-Old Sea Monster Had 50 Legs and Giant Claws

    508-Million-Year-Old Sea Monster Had 50 Legs and Giant ClawsA 508-million-year-old critter — one that looks like a weird lobster with 50 legs, two claws and a tent-like shell — is the oldest known arthropod with mandibles on record, a new study finds. Arthropods are a group of invertebrates that includes spiders, insects and crustaceans. Many arthropods, including flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes, have mandibles — appendages that can grasp, crush and cut food.


  • Scientists Should Just Be Political

    Scientists Should Just Be PoliticalThe sorrow of the March for Science did not hit me until I saw a photo from it—an older woman standing next to a homemade sign adorned with Ms. Frizzle.


  • Antarctica Blood Falls mystery solved? Find out the source of the red water

    Antarctica Blood Falls mystery solved? Find out the source of the red waterThe source of Antarctica's gruesome looking Blood Falls has finally been discovered putting an end to the mystery of where the red water came from. Researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks have now concluded that the blood resembling liquid is iron-rich brine that comes from a more than million-year-old lake trapped beneath the Taylor Glacier. It is the same process that gives iron a dark red colour when it rusts.


  • Not All Cultures Have Numbers, but How Do They Tell Time?

    Not All Cultures Have Numbers, but How Do They Tell Time?This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.


  • This Startup Has a Natural Solution to the $2.6 Trillion Food Waste Problem

    This Startup Has a Natural Solution to the $2.6 Trillion Food Waste ProblemUsing banana skins to save themselves.


  • The five universal laws of human stupidity

    The five universal laws of human stupidityIn 1976, a professor of economic history at the University of California, Berkeley published an essay outlining the fundamental laws of a force he perceived as humanity’s greatest existential threat: Stupidity. Stupid people, Carlo M. Cipolla explained, share several identifying traits: they are abundant, they are irrational, and they cause problems for others without apparent…


  • Illegal Pot Use Is Rising in States That Have Legalized Medical Marijuana

    Illegal Pot Use Is Rising in States That Have Legalized Medical MarijuanaIn recent years, illegal marijuana use has risen faster in states that have legalized medical marijuana than in states without such laws, a new study finds. Although medical marijuana laws may benefit some people, changes to state laws also may have negative consequences for public health, the researchers, led by Deborah Hasin, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University in New York City, wrote in the study. As of November 2016, a total of 28 states have passed medical marijuana laws, according to the study, published today (April 26) in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.


  • These are the sports that burn the most calories

    These are the sports that burn the most caloriesSports are a great way to get in some exercise. And while burning calories isn't the only measure...


  • The 7 Highest-Paying College Degrees All Earn Over $60,000

    The 7 Highest-Paying College Degrees All Earn Over $60,000Are you trying to decide on a college major? Here are the ones that can give you the most bang for your buck.


  • Meet four of the startups in the Founder Spotlight at TC Disrupt NY

    Meet four of the startups in the Founder Spotlight at TC Disrupt NYAt Disrupt NY in May, we're launching the Founder Spotlight, where startup founders will be able to tell the human story behind their company.We've already revealed a handful of those companies, and today we're excited to tell you about the rest of them.Bowery FarmingBowery Farming is a startup looking to change the way we grow food. With...


  • Soul-searching scientists struggle to get message across

    Soul-searching scientists struggle to get message acrossVienna (AFP) - "We mortals do not understand you." That's the heartfelt cry from former UN climate chief Christiana Figueres, pleading with scientists to use everyday language to help counter growing public mistrust. Figueres was giving one explanation of why scientists are struggling to get their message across to a sceptical public at a major conference in Vienna this week. "I think it's the conceitedness, in a way," said Heike Langenberg, chief editor of the journal Nature Geoscience.


  • Robots, high-tech tools join battle against invasive species

    Robots, high-tech tools join battle against invasive speciesWASHINGTON (AP) — A robot zaps and vacuums up venomous lionfish in Bermuda. A helicopter pelts Guam's trees with poison-baited dead mice to fight the voracious brown tree snake. A special boat with giant winglike nets stuns and catches Asian carp in the U.S. Midwest.


  • Beware of Bogus Cancer Treatments, FDA Says

    Beware of Bogus Cancer Treatments, FDA SaysAmericans should be wary of products claiming to treat or cure cancer, as a number of products are falsely making these claims, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Today (April 25), the FDA sent warning letters to 14 U.S. companies saying that the businesses are breaking the law by making unproven claims about their products. "Consumers should not use these or similar unproven products, because they may be unsafe and could prevent a person from seeking an appropriate and potentially life-saving cancer diagnosis or treatment," Douglas Stearn, director of the Office of Enforcement and Import Operations at the FDA, said in a statement.


  • Scientists discover origins of ancient Hopewell culture's meteorite jewellery

    Scientists discover origins of ancient Hopewell culture's meteorite jewelleryThe native Hopewell culture, which thrived along rivers and streams in North America from 200BC to 500AD, is today survived by a number of beautiful artefacts made from exotic materials – including copper and silver. It is not known how these artefacts were viewed among the Hopewell, but what is certain is that they were extremely scarce due to the fact that meteoritic iron is so rare. In 1945, researchers discovered 22 beads made of meteoritic iron, hidden in a burial mound at the Havana site in Illinois.


  • Scientists Discovered the Trick to Actually Getting Over Your Ex

    Scientists Discovered the Trick to Actually Getting Over Your ExHere's how you do it.


  • Scientists just discovered something awesome about the soil on Mars

    Scientists just discovered something awesome about the soil on Mars

    Humans will one day walk on Mars and while it almost certainly won't happen on the fever-dream timeline that Donald Trump seems to think is possible, it'll definitely happen sooner rather than later. The technology to get us there either already exists or is in active development, but what about once we arrive? The first Mars travelers are going to need a place to stay, and researchers from UC San Diego may have just figured out how those brave adventurers will build the very first human structure on the Red Planet.

    The research, which was published in Scientific Reports, reveals that the soil on Mars is particularly well-suited to brick making. In fact, the dirt is so easily formed into bricks that building a rigid structure out of it wouldn't require any special substance or even heat to bake them, and it's all thanks to the same material that gives the Mars surface its reddish hue.

    At first, engineers at the university were trying to figure out exactly how much additional polymer would be needed for the Mars soil to be shaped into bricks. As they gradually reduced the amount of additive used with their soil simulant they eventually realized that they didn't need any at all. The team was able to successfully compact iron-oxide-rich Mars dirt with a flexible container which was then pressurized. The result was small, firm blobs of soil which were stable enough to be cut into brick-like shapes.

    Amazingly, the pressure-made bricks are also shockingly durable, standing up to some serious punishment in testing. According to the paper, the bricks are stronger than the steel-reinforced concrete that many structures are made of here on Earth. It seems the first Mars visitors could find themselves with the construction opportunity of a lifetime.


  • Humans May Have Occupied North America 100,000 Years Earlier Than Thought

    Humans May Have Occupied North America 100,000 Years Earlier Than ThoughtEarly humans may have lived on the North American continent 130,000 years ago, more than 100,000 years earlier than scientists previously believed, according to a new study. The research examined ancient mastodon bones that bore "conclusive" signs of being handled by intelligent beings, the researchers said. Palaeontologists called to the site confirmed that the bones belonged to a long-extinct Pleistocene mastodon, a significant discovery on its own.


  • Study of one-handed people reveals how the brain adapts after losing a body part

    Study of one-handed people reveals how the brain adapts after losing a body partStudy shows that multiple body parts can make use of the brain's 'hand area' in people with only one hand.