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  • Scientists think toxic algae may be to blame for Florida's stumbling panthers, bobcats

    Scientists think toxic algae may be to blame for Florida's stumbling panthers, bobcatsFlorida's fish and wildlife agency has confirmed that one panther and one bobcat have shown positive results for neurological damage.


  • Extracted eggs may stop extinction of northern white rhino

    Extracted eggs may stop extinction of northern white rhinoWildlife experts and veterinarians said Friday there is hope to prevent the extinction of the northern white rhino because they successfully extracted eggs from the last two remaining females of the species. The eggs will be used to reproduce the species through a surrogate. The groundbreaking procedure was carried out Thursday on the northern white rhinos known as Najin and Fatu who cannot carry a pregnancy.


  • AP Explains: The causes and risks of the Amazon fires

    AP Explains: The causes and risks of the Amazon firesFires have been breaking out at an unusual pace in Brazil this year, causing global alarm over deforestation in the Amazon region. Brazil's National Space Research Institute, which monitors deforestation, has recorded 76,720 wildfires across the country this year, as of Thursday. The agency says it doesn't have figures for the area burned, but deforestation as a whole has accelerated in the Amazon this year.


  • Bolsonaro prepares to send army to contain Amazon fires

    Bolsonaro prepares to send army to contain Amazon firesUnder increasing international pressure to contain fires sweeping parts of the Amazon, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro said Friday he might send the military to battle the massive blazes. "That's the plan," said Bolsonaro. Bolsonaro has previously described rainforest protections as an obstacle to economic development, sparring with critics who note that the Amazon produces vast amounts of oxygen and is considered crucial in efforts to contain global warming.


  • Voters Back Liability For Companies That Mislead About Climate Change: Poll

    Voters Back Liability For Companies That Mislead About Climate Change: PollSupport for the idea is especially strong among Democrats and independents.


  • A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'

    A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'Environmental activists worry about the perils of placing nuclear reactors at sea, where they could be vulnerable to climate-related disasters.


  • Geoengineering: 'Plan B' for the planet

    Geoengineering: 'Plan B' for the planetParis (AFP) - Dismissed a decade ago as far-fetched and dangerous, schemes to tame global warming by engineering the climate have migrated from the margins of policy debates towards centre stage.


  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Greta Thunberg want everyone to fly less to fight climate change. Germany and Sweden are already embracing the 'flight shame' movement

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Greta Thunberg want everyone to fly less to fight climate change. Germany and Sweden are already embracing the 'flight shame' movementThe anti-air travel "flight shame" movement has taken off in Germany and Sweden, but might be doomed in the US, despite Ocasio-Cortez's aspirations.


  • Scientists harvest eggs of last two surviving white rhino to pull species from brink of extinction

    Scientists harvest eggs of last two surviving white rhino to pull species from brink of extinctionA Jurassic Park-style plan to bring back an effectively extinct species took a step towards being realised after scientists successfully harvested eggs from world's last two northern white rhino.  Northern white rhino was thought to be doomed forever when Sudan, the planet's last male, died at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya in March 2018.    He was survived only by Najin, 30 and her daughter Fatu, who live under 18 live under 24 hour armed guard in the same conservancy, but are both unable to become pregnant.   But now an international consortium of scientists is using frozen sperm from four deceased males and eggs harvested from the two females to raise the species from the dead.  "We succeeded in getting 10 eggs, which is fantastic. They arrived in Italy on Friday morning and will be matured before being applied to sperm to create embryos," said Steven Seet a spokesman for the IZW and partner in the project.  Because neither Najin nor Fatu are healthy enough to carry a pregnancy to term, the plan is to implant the embryos in the wombs of  southern white rhinos, a closely related subspecies still found in large numbers in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Botswana.   Fatu is escorted by armed rangers around Ol Pejeta Conservancy near Nanyuki Credit: DAI KUROKAWA/EPA-EFE/REX It has not been tried before and the embryos will have to be frozen while scientists perfect the technique. They hope to produce living offspring withing three years.  "I am pretty sure we will overcome that hurdle. But even if we are able to have those frozen embryos and store them for 3000 years or longer, we can say with have saved the whole organism for future generations," said Mr Seet.   The BioRescue project was formally launched in June with four million Euros in funding from Germany's Federal Ministry of Education and Research, although the scientists involved have been working self-funded for several years.  The IZW describes the project, which also involves the Italian biotech laboratory Avantea, the Dvur Kralove zoo in Czechia, and the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), as an "attempt to push the boundaries of what is medically and technically feasible."    While the plan is slightly less far fetched than the one depicted in Jurassic Park, which used DNA frozen for millions of years in amber to clone dinosaurs, its advocates admit it will faces major scientific hurdles and will raise new questions in medical ethics.   In the best case scenario, only a handful of calves maybe born from Najin and Fatu's eggs, and the lack of genetic diversity between the half-siblings could make it impossible to create a viable breeding population.  A team of scientists successfully harvested eggs from the two female northern white rhinos  Credit: AMI VITALE/OL PEJETA CONSERVANCY/HANDOUT/EPA-EFE/ To tackle that, the project has bought in leading researchers from Germany, Italy, Japan, and the US to try and create artificial sex cells via stem cells sourced from the frozen skin tissue of unrelated northern whites.  Using stem cells to create artificial life is one of the most controversial areas of medical science. Barabra Demori, a moral philosopher from the University of Padua, has been asked to oversee the ethical dimension of the work.  John Waweru, the director general of the KWS, said: "We are delighted that this partnership gets us one step closer to prevent extinction of the northern white rhinos. This is particularly touching given the heartbreaking death of Sudan, the last male, who died of old age last year in Kenya." With no natural predators, northern white rhino once roamed in their thousands across the grassy plains that stretch along the southern edge of the Sahara desert, including in Uganda, the Central African Republic, Sudan, and Chad.   But demand for rhino horn for use in Chinese medicine and dagger handles in Yemen fueled a poaching crisis that saw them wiped out in large parts of their range in the 1980s and 1970s. They were considered extinct in the wild in 2008 after a wide ranging survey failed to find any specimens.  One last wild sighting was made by Russian helicopter pilots who saw three rhinos thought to be northern whites while overflying a remote part of Sudan in 2010,  but none have been seen since.


  • Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisis

    Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisisCandidates like Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker want to draw on tactics used by community-based organizations to fight gun violence.


  • European demos held over Amazon fires

    European demos held over Amazon firesClimate change activists chanting slogans and waving banners demonstrated outside Brazil's embassy in London on Friday, urging President Jair Bolsonaro to do more to halt the fires in the Amazon rainforest. The protests came as British Prime Minister Boris Johnson described the fires as an "international crisis" ahead of a G7 summit in France this weekend where the issue is expected to feature prominently. "The fires ravaging the Amazon rainforest are not only heartbreaking, they are an international crisis," Johnson tweeted.


  • Climate activists demonstrate outside Brazil embassies in Paris and London

    Climate activists demonstrate outside Brazil embassies in Paris and LondonPARIS/LONDON (Reuters) - Several hundred environmental activists demonstrated on Friday outside the Brazilian embassy in Paris as a clash between the two countries' leaders over the issue of climate change intensified, while similar protests took place in London. On Thursday, French President Emmanuel Macron and U.N. Secretary General António Guterres expressed concerns about wildfires that are raging in the Amazon, but Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro responded angrily to what he regarded as meddling.


  • Macron Opposes Mercosur Trade, Saying Brazil ‘Lied’ on Climate

    Macron Opposes Mercosur Trade, Saying Brazil ‘Lied’ on Climate(Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Outraged over the Amazon fires, Emmanuel Macron branded Brazil’s president a liar and threatened to block the European Union’s trade deal with the Mercosur countries as he prepares to whip the Group of Seven leaders into climate action.The French president’s office said that it has become clear that Jair Bolsonaro wasn’t serious about his commitments on tackling climate change when he spoke to world leaders at the Group of 20 summit in Osaka earlier this year."The president can only conclude that President Bolsonaro lied to him in Osaka," at the G-20, the statement said. "Under these conditions, France is opposed to the Mercosur deal."A day before he’s due to welcome G-7 leaders to Biarritz, Macron said he would make the burning of the Amazon jungle a priority at the summit. That provoked an angry response from Bolsonaro, who accused him of acting like a colonialist."The news is really worrisome, but we need to lower the temperature, there are fires in Brazil every year," Brazilian Agriculture Minister Tereza Cristina Dias told reporters in Brasilia. "There were fires in Portugal, in Siberia, there were fires all over the world and Brazil wasn’t questioning them."Trade, ClimateThe way that an environmental dispute escalated so quickly into a new front in the global trade tensions shows the growing importance of climate as a fundamental plank of geopolitics. Even before Macron’s announcement, Ireland said it could not vote for the Mercosur agreement and Finland wants the EU to consider a ban on Brazilian beef.The EU has sought to leverage the size of its market to pressure trading partners into doing more to reduce emissions and is also concerned that its companies will be undercut by rivals operating in places with looser restrictions.But the configuration of the G-7 right now will make it difficult for Macron to make a lot headway beyond some token words. Donald Trump famously ripped up last year’s communique and does not want to be cornered. U.K.’s Boris Johnson is eager to tighten his bond with the U.S. president and at odds with European allies over Brexit. Italy is mired in a messy political crisis at home and has no prime minister. Japan is unlikely to stick its neck out -- it is more concerned about the potential fallout from the U.S. trade war with China.In fact, the run-up to the G-7 was overshadowed by China whacking the U.S. with higher tariffs on soybeans, cars and oil in retaliation for Trump’s latest planned levies.And Trump himself has signaled where his priorities lie. On waking up he began tweeting against the Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell and China’s Xi Jinping -- not on the Amazon fires. A U.S. official said that the U.S. are deeply concerned about the impact of the fires while indicating the administration did not see it as part of the broader climate issue.The EU wrapped up 20 years of negotiations to seal an accord with South America’s leading customs union just weeks ago, in what was then seen as a major retort toTrump’s attacks on the global system of free trade. The deal could affect almost 90 billion euros ($100 billion) of goods and Brazil expects to see its economy increased by about $90 billion over the next 15 years.Officials on both sides are still fine-tuning the agreement and it still needs to be approved by EU governments before it can enter into force. A Brazilian official, with direct knowledge of the government’s position, said that the EU-Mercosur deal is not ready to be signed yet, and that while the deal could be rejected or put to one side, it could not be changed.The official added that France stood to lose a lot if the agreement didn’t go through, citing the presence of supermarket chain Casino Guichard-Perrachon SA and carmakers such as Renault SA and Peugeot SA.Another senior government official however said that France’s position is a cause of concern and that the Bolsonaro administration needed to change the narrative. There are signs that the president is already poised to do that.Speaking on Friday morning in Brasilia, Bolsonaro said the government is considering declaring a state of emergency in the region, allowing the president to deploy armed forces and extra funding to the region: “We discussed a lot of things and whatever is within our reach we will do. The problem is resources.”(Adds Johnson’s tweet.)\--With assistance from Arne Delfs, Alex Morales, Kati Pohjanpalo, Peter Flanagan, Rachel Gamarski, Mario Sergio Lima and Josh Wingrove.To contact the reporters on this story: Helene Fouquet in Bairritz, France at hfouquet1@bloomberg.net;Simone Iglesias in Brasília at spiglesias@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Flavia Krause-Jackson at fjackson@bloomberg.net, Ben SillsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


  • Russia's floating nuclear plant sails to its destination

    Russia's floating nuclear plant sails to its destinationRussia's first floating nuclear power plant sailed Friday to its destination on the nation's Arctic coast, a project that environmentalists have criticized as unsafe. The Akademik Lomonosov is a 140-meter (459-foot) long towed platform that carries two 35-megawatt nuclear reactors. On Friday, it set out from the Arctic port of Murmansk on the Kola Peninsula on a three-week journey to Pevek on the Chukotka Peninsula more than 4,900 kilometers (about 2,650 nautical miles) east.


  • Science Requires Some Leaps, But No Faith

    Science Requires Some Leaps, But No Faith(Bloomberg Opinion) -- When the universe was born, it was hostile to life. There wasn’t even any carbon until after the first stars forged it from lighter elements. We know life emerged from a nonliving universe, but how this happened is such a profound mystery that humanity has struggled to imagine that it could have happened without supernatural help. People often insist that it requires just as much faith to assume the origin of life happened by natural processes alone as it does to attribute it to gods.But they are wrong. Scientists who want to investigate such a mystery make gambles, not leaps of faith. They are betting their time, effort and career status on the hope that there is a natural explanation, and that they can learn something about it. As new discoveries shed light on the mystery, it’s becoming ever more apparent that they made a winning bet.Betting on natural explanations for natural phenomena has paid off time and time again, while betting on supernatural explanations has never paid off, at least not in revealing useful physical and biological rules. There’s no experiment that can tell us about the nature of the supernatural. It’s an intellectual dead end.The origin of life can seem like magic though. A long-held notion known as vitalism once cut a hard line between the living and non-living world. People thought living things were made of a different substance entirely from inanimate things. But now we know the basic elements of chemistry are the same in living things as in the earth’s crust and atmosphere. Some of the complex organic molecules associated with life crop up in asteroids, comets and deep space.Discoveries in chemistry are showing how components of living things can assemble themselves. Recently, scientists from the University of Washington showed how something very much like a cell membrane could form spontaneously from fatty acids and amino acids, which themselves can appear without life. The process of membrane formation may help assemble critical molecules – the proteins – from smaller building blocks.Life is not made from membranes alone, though, and other groups are trying to understand the origin of DNA, which living things use to carry instructions. Scientists think early life used a related information-carrying molecule, RNA, and that this evolved from some simpler information-carrying precursor. There’s been progress testing this idea, too.Understanding how those building blocks came together to make earthly life could help scientists understand how widespread life might be in the universe, and where to look for it.It's possible that piece by piece, scientists will solve the origin-of-life mystery within the coming decades. It will take guts to delve into the unknown and take some chances in pursuit of evidence – testing the plausibility of various steps and precursors that may or may not have been on the road to the formation of life on earth. There will be leaps required, but no faith.To contact the author of this story: Faye Flam at fflam1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Philip Gray at philipgray@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Faye Flam is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. She has written for the Economist, the New York Times, the Washington Post, Psychology Today, Science and other publications. She has a degree in geophysics from the California Institute of Technology.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


  • Amgen Presents Positive Data From Rituxan Biosimilar Study

    Amgen Presents Positive Data From Rituxan Biosimilar StudyAmgen (AMGN) markets Mvasi and Kanjinti, biosimilar versions of Avastin and Herceptin, respectively in the United States, and Kanjinti and Amgevita, biosimilar of Humira, in the EU.


  • Democrats are blowing it on climate change

    Democrats are blowing it on climate changeA carbon tax is the best way to start fighting global warming. Nobody will say so.


  • Amazon rainforest fire a 'crisis', Macron says, but Brazil pushes back: What we know

    Amazon rainforest fire a 'crisis', Macron says, but Brazil pushes back: What we knowAs wildfires rage in the Amazon rainforest, global attention has ignited bitter dispute about who is the blame for burning "the lungs of the planet."


  • Arcwest Exploration Inc. Provides Exploration Update on its Eagle and Sparrowhawk Porphyry Projects, Central B.C. and Stakes Newly Discovered Porphyry Copper Prospect

    Arcwest Exploration Inc. Provides Exploration Update on its Eagle and Sparrowhawk Porphyry Projects, Central B.C. and Stakes Newly Discovered Porphyry Copper ProspectVancouver, British Columbia--(Newsfile Corp. - August 23, 2019) - ArcWest Exploration Inc. (TSXV: AWX) ("ArcWest") is pleased to announce results of reconnaissance geological mapping and rock geochemical surveys on its Eagle and Sparrowhawk porphyry copper-gold (Cu-Au) projects, central British Columbia, as well as the acquisition of a newly discovered porphyry Cu prospect on northern Vancouver Island east of its Teeta Creek Cu-Au Project. Rock geochemical samples were select grabs from outcrops across the ...


  • Scientists a step closer to saving northern white rhino from extinction

    Scientists a step closer to saving northern white rhino from extinctionVeterinarians have successfully harvested eggs from the last two surviving northern white rhinos, taking them one step closer to bringing the species back from the brink of extinction, scientists said in Kenya on Friday. Science is the only hope for the northern white rhino after the death last year of the last male, named Sudan, at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya where the groundbreaking procedure was carried out Thursday. Two females, Najin, 30, and daughter Fatu, 19, are the only survivors of the subspecies of white rhino, and live under 24-hour armed guard at Ol Pejeta.


  • Retrophin Down on Neurological Disorder Drug Study Failure

    Retrophin Down on Neurological Disorder Drug Study FailureRetrophin (RTRX) declines as the late-stage study on a rare neurological disorder candidate failed to achieve its main goal.


  • Brazil's climate change skeptic government says warnings about the fires consuming the Amazon are 'sensationalist,' 'hysterical,' and 'misleading'

    Brazil's climate change skeptic government says warnings about the fires consuming the Amazon are 'sensationalist,' 'hysterical,' and 'misleading'President Jair Bolsonaro dismissed the idea that the Amazon fires should be discussed at the G7 summit, an idea proposed by France's Emmanuel Macron.


  • Prince Harry’s Shaming Is Bad News for Private Jets

    Prince Harry’s Shaming Is Bad News for Private Jets(Bloomberg Opinion) -- Given the swelling ranks of the world’s billionaires, you’d have thought the past 10 years would have been fabulous for private jet suppliers.In reality, the period since the great recession has been a “lost decade” for the industry’s manufacturers, analysts say. A glut of second-hand aircraft sapped demand for new models, while shared ownership and renting became popular alternatives to buying a plane outright. Meanwhile, large corporations that once thought nothing of jetting their execs around in comfort started scrutinizing budgets and worrying about conspicuous excess. In 2017 General Electric Co. said it would sell its fleet after unflattering reports about its former boss, Jeff “two planes” Immelt.The industry seemed to have turned a corner recently thanks to the U.S. economic recovery, a fresh lineup of bigger models, plus tax giveaways from President Donald Trump that made it much cheaper to purchase a plane. North America is expected to account for more than half the global market for private jets in the next five years, according to Honeywell International Inc.Yet suppliers face another looming threat: Our rapidly heating planet might make boarding a fuel-guzzling jet seem unconscionable. In Sweden there’s even a word for this new aversion to flying: flygskam or “flight shame.” Are the super-wealthy 1% susceptible too?It’s not just climate campaigners who think the industry has an image problem. Warren East, chief executive of the jet engine-maker Rolls-Royce Holdings Plc, said recently that aviation as a whole “is built on setting fire to hydrocarbons” and needs to wean itself off that “quite quickly.” Bombardier Inc., owner of the Learjet brand, warned in its annual report that “the impact to us and our industry from legislation and increased regulation regarding climate change is likely to be adverse and could be significant.”The globe-trotting business elite and A-list celebrities who once made private jets such desirable status symbols certainly aren’t helping the industry’s image problem, with the media increasingly taking issue with those who preach the environmentalist faith while turning up at events in their Gulfstreams.The British royal Prince Harry has been dubbed the “Carbon Footprince” by his country’s press after taking several private flights to the Mediterranean this summer despite his outspokenness on ecological issues. It’s doubly ironic that one of those journeys was to Alphabet Inc.’s four-day climate change summit in Sicily, where an epic queue of private jets rather undermined the well-intended activism.You can see what the critics are getting at from a “do as I say, not what I do” perspective. Travelling by private jet produces several times more carbon dioxide than purchasing an economy seat on a commercial flight (precisely how much depends on how many people are on board and whether the jet flies home empty). The average American is responsible for about 16 tons of CO2 emissions per year. That’s already three times the global average, but it’s only a fraction of what private jets produce in a typical year.As such, the tax advantages for private jets are very hard to justify. Nor is it helpful that many operators will be exempt from the aviation industry’s commitment – known as Corsia – to cap net emissions at 2020 levels and to halve these by 2050.(1)Banning private jets, as some have suggested, wouldn’t do much to curb climate change as there are only about 20,000 of them operating today. The aviation industry accounts for about 2%-3% of global emissions and private jets perhaps pump out as little as 0.04% of the total, according to industry groups.But symbolism matters in the climate debate. If private jet users aren’t seen to be doing their bit, they can’t reasonably expect poorer folk to make sacrifices either. While the purchase of carbon offsets to make up for the impact is worthy and rational, intellectual justifications are a hard sell on this topic.Of course, private jets aren’t just frivolous toys, they have their uses too as a time-saving device for executives. As such, their users and makers will be eager to combat any burgeoning environmental backlash through the development of cleaner technologies. Carbon efficiency no doubt will become as important as time efficiency in selling planes.Startups such as Eviation, as well as incumbent manufacturers and suppliers, are already plowing money into hybrid and electric aircraft. The industry is also trying to encourage operators to use non-petroleum fuels, although they’re expensive and hard to get hold of. Because of the limited energy density of batteries, it’s probable that smaller aircraft will be the first to go electric. In the meantime, my guess is that rich folk will think twice before posting a shot of their plush planes on Instagram. The Swedes have a word for that too: smygflyga – “flying in secret.”  (1) Planes with a maximum takeoff weight of below 5700kg and operatorswith fewerthan 10,000 tonnes of annual carbon emissions are excluded. The private jet industry says it will pursue voluntarily the same goals anyway.To contact the author of this story: Chris Bryant at cbryant32@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


  • Heart attacks halved by daily 'polypill', strokes reduced too: study

    Heart attacks halved by daily 'polypill', strokes reduced too: studyA cheap, once-a-day pill combining aspirin with drugs that lower blood pressure and cholesterol cuts cardiovascular disease as a whole by a third, and heart attacks by more than half, researchers said Friday. For those with a history of heart problems and strokes, the drug combo was only half as effective compared to the control group, who received advice on healthy living but no drugs. Among participants who took the pill as directed -- at least 70 percent of the time -- heart attack incidence declined by 57 percent.


  • Scientists a step closer to saving northern white rhino from extinction

    Scientists a step closer to saving northern white rhino from extinctionVeterinarians have successfully harvested eggs from the last two surviving northern white rhinos, taking them one step closer to bringing the species back from the brink of extinction, scientists said in Kenya on Friday. Science is the only hope for the northern white rhino after the death last year of the last male, named Sudan, at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya where the groundbreaking procedure was carried out Thursday. Two females, Najin, 30, and daughter Fatu, 19, are the only survivors of the subspecies of white rhino, and live under 24-hour armed guard at Ol Pejeta.


  • EU piles pressure on Brazil over Amazon fires

    EU piles pressure on Brazil over Amazon firesDUBLIN/BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The European Union piled pressure on Friday on Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro over fires raging in the Amazon basin, with Ireland and France saying they could block a trade deal with South America. Bolsonaro has rejected what he calls foreign interference in domestic affairs in Brazil, where vast tracts of the Amazon rainforest are ablaze in what is known as the burning season. Environmentalists have blamed deforestation for an increase in fires and accuse the right-wing president of relaxing protection of a vast carbon trap and climate driver that is crucial to combating global climate change.


  • Bernie Sanders assures fossil fuel workers his Green New Deal will protect their jobs

    Bernie Sanders assures fossil fuel workers his Green New Deal will protect their jobsPresidential candidate Bernie Sanders explains why his $16.3 trillion climate change plan benefits the working class.


  • Black super new moon 2019: What is it and will we be able to see the lunar event in the UK?

    Black super new moon 2019: What is it and will we be able to see the lunar event in the UK?A black super new moon is the next lunar phenomenon to take place this year, when both a black moon and a super new moon will occur at the same time.  While North America’s black moon occurred slightly earlier on July 31, it won’t take place in Europe until next week. But, what exactly is a black moon and a supermoon, and will we be able to see the event?  Here is everything you need to know about the black super new moon, including definitions and the science behind Earth’s only natural satellite. What is a black moon? There is actually no single, accepted definition for black moon, but it is used by stargazers to describe three phenomena. In most cases, it refers to the second occurrence of a new moon in a single calendar month. This type will next take place in the UK on August 30, 2019.  Some may use black moon to describe the third new moon in a season of four new moons. Each season usually sees three new moons, but a fourth takes place around every 33 months. Black moon also refers to a month, which sees no new moons. This tends to take place every 19 years and can only happen in February because it is shorter than a lunation.  So what exactly is a new moon? A new moon is the first lunar phase, when the sun and moon are aligned and the sun and earth are on opposite sides of the moon. This month has already seen one new moon occur on August 1, with another to follow on August 30.   What about a supermoon? The name “supermoon” typically describes a moon that appears larger and brighter in the sky.  Factually speaking, this occurs when the moon is at its closest point, or perigee, to Earth during its elliptical orbit.  How a supermoon is generated However, there are actually two types, a super full moon, the name given to a full moon at its nearest point to Earth, and a super new moon, the term used to describe a new moon at its closest approach to Earth.  A super full moon is the type that usually attracts celestial fanfare. When the sky is clear and visibility is good, the moon can appear up to 14 per cent bigger and 30 per cent brighter to the naked eye.   At the start of 2019, we were treated to three super full moons on January 21, February 19 and March 21. This year, the UK has also seen a super new moon occur on August 1, with another two set to take place on August 30 and September 28. But, a super new moon is less exciting for space fans because it is invisible from Earth.  Moon-gazing | Our satellite’s next three big events Will we be able to see the black super new moon in the UK? Unfortunately for us earthlings, new moons are invisible to the naked eye. The alignment of the Sun, the moon and Earth leaves the area of the moon that faces the Earth in darkness, therefore hiding the natural satellite’s bright white hue.  New moons also rise and set at the same time as the Sun, bringing them too close to the Sun’s glare. But following the lunar event, the moon becomes visible again the next day, appearing in the sky as a beautiful waxing crescent moon.


  • Sea turtles at risk as Trump weakens protections of animals endangered by climate crisis

    Sea turtles at risk as Trump weakens protections of animals endangered by climate crisisAdministration’s move is a ‘head in the sand approach’ that will further imperil creatures threatened by the climate crisisA loggerhead sea turtle. Rising seas and escalating temperatures threaten to wipe out some of the world’s premier sea turtle nesting habitat. Photograph: Denise Cathey/APLife as a sea turtle is already harrowing. Emerging alone from a shell to crawl through a deadly gauntlet of predatory birds, dogs and ants, all for the goal of reaching the ocean, a place where fish swallow you whole and fragments of discarded plastic slowly suffocate you.Now climate change – in the form of sea level rise, rising temperatures and fiercer storms – is adding further, existential hardships and in the US a recent weakening of endangered species protections by the Trump administration will further imperil sea turtles and other creatures threatened by the climate crisis.So a coalition of environmental groups has launched a federal court lawsuit to halt the Trump administration’s new interpretation of the Endangered Species Act, America’s bedrock conservation law. The changes will, among other things, limit consideration of threats to species to the “foreseeable future” and make it harder to place protections on important habitat.Conservationists say this new regime is likely to disregard the looming long-term danger posed by climate change to creatures such as the Canada lynx, which is deemed likely to be largely wiped out by 2100, as well as the Florida key deer, a diminutive endangered deer, and the Florida mole skink, a five-inch-long lizard, both of which reside in Florida Keys, an area acutely vulnerable to sea level rise.The Trump administration’s move is a “head in the sand approach to climate change”, according to Noah Greenwald, endangered species director at the Center for Biological Diversity, one of the groups suing the federal government.Karimah Schoenhut, a Sierra Club staff attorney, added: “In the face of the climate crisis, the result of this abandonment of responsibility will be extinction.”The Endangered Species Act, which became law in 1973, has been hailed for warding off the extinction of species including the bald eagle, American alligator and the humpback whale.The Trump administration has said its new interpretation will make the act more efficient and business-friendly. “The act’s effectiveness rests on clear, consistent and efficient implementation,” said David Bernhardt, secretary of the interior.But the climate crisis poses a relentless, multifaceted threat to species that 1970s lawmakers could barely conceive. Recent research has found many animals are unlikely to adapt quickly enough to global heating, even species like birds that are considered highly mobile and able to adjust the timing of egg laying.In Florida, the rising seas and escalating temperatures threaten to wipe out some of the world’s premier sea turtle nesting habitat. Eroding beaches are washing away egg-laden nests, while the rising heat is distorting the sex of hatchlings by making many more embryos female than male.Justin Perrault has worked to conserve sea turtles along a nine-mile expanse of Juno Beach, north of Miami. He was previously able to drive a vehicle along the sand in front of a stretch of seawall but that is now impossible as the beach has winnowed away.“Certain parts of the beach get very narrow with the erosion, which seems to be getting worse,” sad Perrault, research director at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center. “We are getting more frequent storms which wipes out nests too. We lost a lot when Hurricane Irma hit.”Juno Beach is one of the most densely nested sites in the world for loggerhead turtles. There are about 21,000 nests on the beach, including loggerheads, leatherback and green turtles, with the animals laying eggs throughout spring and summer. The scale of this nesting would make it a enormous task to relocate the turtles elsewhere as the seas continue to rise along the low-lying Florida coast.A trio of environment groups recently launched a separate lawsuit against the Trump administration to force it to protect green turtle habitat, in an effort to stave off the worst.Similar legal challenges are being waged over other species left alone to cope with climate change, such as California’s fabled Joshua trees, which scientists predict will mostly vanish even if planet-warming emissions are rapidly cut. The federal government recently dismissed a petition to protect the trees under the Endangered Species Act.“It appears that this administration is ignoring the science because they don’t believe in climate change,” said Taylor Jones, endangered species advocate for WildEarth Guardians, one of the groups suing the government. “This is blatant disregard of the climate crisis.”But the overwhelming range of environmental changes triggered by the climate crisis means that many species are still likely to perish even if they are protected under the law. The battle against the Trump administration may ultimately prove futile.“Climate change is basically going to swamp the Endangered Species Act as it’s not equipped to deal with global-scale disruptions,” said JB Ruhl, an environmental law expert at Vanderbilt University. “The act can’t stop that.”


  • Daily 'polypill' reduces heart disease, stroke: study

    Daily 'polypill' reduces heart disease, stroke: studyA cheap, once-a-day pill combining aspirin with drugs that lower blood pressure and cholesterol cuts the risk of major heart failure and stroke by a third, researchers said Friday. In patients with a history of heart problems and strokes, the drug combo was only half as effective compared to the control group, who received advice on healthy living but no drugs. The polypill concept was first proposed more than 20 years ago as a simpler, cost-effective approach to treating cardiovascular disease, which often requires taking several medications.


  • The Amazon is losing about 3 football fields' worth of rainforest per minute

    The Amazon is losing about 3 football fields' worth of rainforest per minuteDamage to this much of the rainforest, sometimes referred to as "lungs of the planet," could make the effects of climate change irreversible.


  • Cheap combo pill cuts heart, stroke risks, study finds

    Cheap combo pill cuts heart, stroke risks, study findsA cheap daily pill that combines four drugs cut the risk of heart attacks, strokes and heart failure in a large study, suggesting it could be a good way to help prevent heart problems especially in poor countries. The pills contained two blood pressure drugs, a cholesterol medicine and aspirin. Many people can't afford or don't stick with taking so many medicines separately, so doctors think a polypill might help.


  • Owning a dog can help your heart, study finds

    Owning a dog can help your heart, study findsAccording to a new study published by Mayo Clinic, people who own pets, but especially dogs, are more likely to have better heart health. "It's nice to see that something we enjoy, like having a dog, is related to better heart health," Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, study author and chair of the Division of Preventative Cardiology at Mayo Clinic, told ABC News in an interview. "It's very difficult not to increase the level of activity after you get a pet, in particular, a dog … It makes more sense … they move around.


  • Bernie Sanders meets California fire victims, lays out Green New Deal

    Bernie Sanders meets California fire victims, lays out Green New DealWASHINGTON/SACRAMENTO (Reuters) - Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders on Thursday unveiled a $16.3 trillion climate change strategy on a tour of northern California that included meeting families displaced by deadly wildfires and a rally in the state capital Sacramento. The plan would "launch a decade of the Green New Deal", a 10-year federal "mobilization" that would factor climate change into every policy action from immigration to foreign policy while promising to create 20 million jobs in the process. The U.S. would generate 100% of its electricity from renewable energy by 2030 and achieve "full decarbonization" by 2050, according to the plan.


  • Florida scientists induce spawning of Atlantic coral in lab for first time

    Florida scientists induce spawning of Atlantic coral in lab for first timeScientists in Florida have artificially induced reproductive spawning of an endangered Atlantic coral species for the first time in an aquarium setting, a breakthrough they say holds great promise in efforts to restore depleted reefs in the wild. The achievement, announced this week at the Florida Aquarium in Apollo Beach near Tampa, borrowed from lab techniques developed at the London-based Horniman Museum and Gardens and used previously to induce spawning of 18 species of Pacific coral, officials said. Scientists plan to use their newly acquired expertise to breed new coral colonies that can one day repopulate the beleaguered Florida reef system, one of the largest in the world and one decimated by climate change, pollution and disease in recent decades.


  • Florida scientists induce spawning of Atlantic coral in lab for first time

    Florida scientists induce spawning of Atlantic coral in lab for first timeScientists in Florida have artificially induced reproductive spawning of an endangered Atlantic coral species for the first time in an aquarium setting, a breakthrough they say holds great promise in efforts to restore depleted reefs in the wild. The achievement, announced this week at the Florida Aquarium in Apollo Beach near Tampa, borrowed from lab techniques developed at the London-based Horniman Museum and Gardens and used previously to induce spawning of 18 species of Pacific coral, officials said. Scientists plan to use their newly acquired expertise to breed new coral colonies that can one day repopulate the beleaguered Florida reef system, one of the largest in the world and one decimated by climate change, pollution and disease in recent decades.


  • Global worry over Amazon fires escalates; Bolsonaro defiant

    Global worry over Amazon fires escalates; Bolsonaro defiantAmid global concern about raging fires in the Amazon, Brazil's government complained Thursday that it is being targeted in smear campaign by critics who contend President Jair Bolsonaro is not doing enough to curb widespread deforestation. The threat to what some call "the lungs of the planet" has ignited a bitter dispute about who is to blame during the tenure of a leader who has described Brazil's rainforest protections as an obstacle to economic development and who traded Twitter jabs on Thursday with France's president over the fires. French President Emmanuel Macron called the wildfires an international crisis and said the leaders of the Group of 7 nations should hold urgent discussions about them at their summit in France this weekend.


  • UN, France raise concern over Amazon wildfires 'crisis'

    UN, France raise concern over Amazon wildfires 'crisis'Paris and the United Nations called Thursday for the protection of the fire-plagued Amazon rainforest as Brazil's right-wing president accused his French counterpart of having a "colonialist mentality" over the issue. Official figures show nearly 73,000 forest fires were recorded in Brazil in the first eight months of the year -- the highest number for any year since 2013. Most were in the Amazon.


  • Industry guidance touts untested tech as climate fix

    Industry guidance touts untested tech as climate fixDraft guidelines for how industry fights climate change promote the widespread use of untested technologies that experts fear could undermine efforts to slash planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions, AFP can reveal. The guidance appears to encourage high-polluting sectors to take the cheapest route towards limiting global warming, potentially decoupling emissions cuts from the temperature goals outlined in the Paris climate agreement. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO), a global industry-driven non-profit group comprising more than 160 member states, has produced new draft guidance on climate action for businesses.


  • Killer smog: Even small amounts of air pollution linked to risk of early death, study finds

    Killer smog: Even small amounts of air pollution linked to risk of early death, study findsSmog isn't just annoying, it's deadly: Exposure to toxic air pollutants is linked to increased cardiovascular and respiratory death rates, study says.


  • The blazes in the Amazon are so big they can be seen from space. One map shows the alarming scale of the fires.

    The blazes in the Amazon are so big they can be seen from space. One map shows the alarming scale of the fires.The Brazilian Amazon is burning at a record rate. Nearly 10,000 fires have sparked in the past week, and satellites have spotted the blazes.


  • Sanders touts $16 trillion climate plan in fire-ravaged town

    Sanders touts $16 trillion climate plan in fire-ravaged townDemocratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders released a $16.3 trillion climate plan on Thursday before touring a Northern California town ravaged by wildfire, declaring the setting a "wake-up call for our entire nation" to the dangers of a warming planet. "Climate change is a major, major crisis for our country, and the entire world, and one of the manifestations of that crisis is what happened here," the Vermont senator said as he walked through a burned-out mobile home park in Paradise alongside people who lost their homes in last November's deadly blaze. Sanders' climate plan calls for the United States to move to renewable energy across the economy by 2050 and declare climate change a national emergency.


  • Fake News Can Give Us False Memories, Study Finds

    Fake News Can Give Us False Memories, Study FindsA new study proves just how easy it is to manipulate people into believing propaganda and misinformation


  • Striking photos show the devastation wreaked by record-breaking fires in the Amazon rainforest

    Striking photos show the devastation wreaked by record-breaking fires in the Amazon rainforestThe Amazon rainforest is burning at a record rate due to deforestation and hot, dry conditions exacerbated by climate change.


  • New images from asteroid probe yield clues on planet formation

    New images from asteroid probe yield clues on planet formationPhotographs snapped by a shoebox-sized probe that explored the near-Earth asteroid Ryugu offer new clues about its composition, insights that are expected to help scientists understand the formation of our solar system. The German-French Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout (MASCOT) was dropped off by Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft on October 3, 2018, free-falling from a height of 41 meters (135 feet) for six minutes before it hit the surface. Ryugu is just 900 meters wide and so its gravity is 66,500 times weaker than Earth's. Had MASCOT been equipped with wheels, its forward motion would have launched it back into space.


  • How Jay Inslee moved the ball on the climate issue in presidential bid, and why he fell short of the goal

    How Jay Inslee moved the ball on the climate issue in presidential bid, and why he fell short of the goalJay Inslee may be out of the presidential race, but he's not out of the minds of climate policy campaigners. The two-term Washington state governor won high praise from his Democratic rivals as well as experts on global climate change after he acknowledged on Wednesday night that he would not be "carrying the ball" in the presidential campaign, largely due to his failure to attract sufficient support in political polls. One of Inslee's problems on the campaign trail was that he didn't have a "unique selling proposition" for his climate policy initiatives, said Aseem Prakash, founding director of the University… Read More


  • 60 Years Ago We Saw Earth From Space for the First Time — Here’s How We See It Now

    60 Years Ago We Saw Earth From Space for the First Time — Here’s How We See It NowFrom “Earthrise” to “Blue Marble,” here are some of the finest out-of-this-world photographs of Earth.


  • Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announces run for 3rd term

    Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announces run for 3rd termWashington Gov. Jay Inslee, who has ended his climate change-focused 2020 presidential bid, announced Thursday that he'll seek a third term as governor. Inslee sent the email detailing his plans hours before he was to appear at a news conference at Planned Parenthood in Seattle regarding the Title X family planning program. "We have provided the nation a road map for innovation, economic growth, and progressive action," he wrote.