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  • Conference: US mayors may shape national climate policy

    Conference: US mayors may shape national climate policyMIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — With the Trump administration's withdrawal from the Paris climate accords, national policy on climate change will emerge from U.S. cities working to reduce emissions and become more resilient to rising sea levels, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said at the annual U.S. Conferences of Mayors meeting in Miami Beach.


  • 2 Amazing Pictures Of Space Taken By An Amateur

    2 Amazing Pictures Of Space Taken By An AmateurThese are some of the most visually striking things related to space.


  • Global green pact supporters launch Paris campaign

    Global green pact supporters launch Paris campaignHollywood star turned activist Arnold Schwarzenegger joined politicians and legal experts in Paris Saturday to launch a campaign for a global pact to protect the human right to a clean, healthy environment. "Less talk, more action," urged former French prime minister Francais Laurent Fabius, who also presided over the 2015 Paris COP 21 conference on climate change. Seeking to underline the urgency of the need to act, Fabius borrowed the turn of phrase from ex-California governor-turned climate campaigner Schwarzenegger, who joined the gathering, as did former UN chief Ban Ki-moon.


  • Strong earthquake injures 2, knocks off roof tiles in Japan

    Strong earthquake injures 2, knocks off roof tiles in JapanTOKYO (AP) — A strong earthquake shook residents Sunday in a mountainous region of central Japan, injuring at least two people and knocking roof tiles off homes.


  • Almanac: Jacques Cousteau

    Almanac: Jacques CousteauOn June 25, 1997, the great ocean explorer and environmental advocate died at the age of 87


  • 'City that never sleeps' wants to dial down the volume

    'City that never sleeps' wants to dial down the volumeNew York is one of the loudest cities in the world. The five-year, $4.6 million project -- the brainchild of researchers at New York University, working in concert with city residents and city hall -- is using machine learning technology and sensors to build a sound library. The idea is to record the full panoply of noises in the city of 8.5 million residents and use artificial intelligence so that machines can recognize sounds automatically, ultimately giving authorities a way to mitigate noise levels.


  • Pets Help in Hospitals, But Safety May Be Lacking

    Pets Help in Hospitals, But Safety May Be LackingResearchers found that hospitals typically had stricter health and safety policies for animal-visitation programs than eldercare facilities did. The facilities surveyed didn't always have strong policies in place to ensure that their animal therapy programs were safe and effective for both the participants and the visiting animals, said veterinarian Deborah Linder, the lead author of the study and associate director of the Tufts Institute for Human-Animal Interaction at Tufts University in North Grafton, Massachusetts. People at health care facilities often assume that therapy-animal organizations have liability insurance, strong training programs for the animals, and testing standards for both the animals and their handlers, as well as rigorous health and grooming requirements for the animals, Linder told Live Science.


  • Beware the Hype of Artificial Intelligence

    Beware the Hype of Artificial IntelligenceBeware the Hype of Artificial Intelligence


  • US investigates after lab improperly ships nuclear material

    US investigates after lab improperly ships nuclear materialALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — U.S. regulators said Friday they are launching an investigation into the improper shipment of nuclear material from the laboratory that created the atomic bomb to other federal facilities this week, marking the latest safety lapse for Los Alamos National Laboratory as it faces growing criticism over its track record.


  • These 4 Animals Are Real Extinct American Creatures

    These 4 Animals Are Real Extinct American CreaturesThey sound like mythical creatures but these prehistoric American animals were very real before they went extinct thousands of years ago.


  • Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop under fire after sharing phony information

    Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop under fire after sharing phony informationGwyneth Paltrow's lifestyle brand website, Goop, removed a claim that Body Vibes' products used material originally made for NASA after it was debunked.


  • Panda mania hits Germany as China's cuddly envoys arrive

    Panda mania hits Germany as China's cuddly envoys arriveGermany had its first taste of panda mania on Saturday as two furry ambassadors arrived from China to begin a new life as stars of Berlin's premier zoo. The pair, named Meng Meng and Jiao Qing, jetted in on a special Lufthansa cargo plane, accompanied by two Chinese panda specialists, the Berlin Zoo's chief vet and a tonne of bamboo. A crowd of journalists and officials on hand to welcome the VIPs let out an "ooooh" as Meng Meng raised a paw after flight LH8415 made an especially gentle touchdown at Schoenefeld airport.


  • What happened when Otto Warmbier was detained in North Korea: Part 2

    What happened when  Otto Warmbier was detained in North Korea: Part 2Officials in North Korea say Warmbier took a poster down from a staff-only floor of the hotel he was staying in.


  • Giant sequoia move on schedule in Idaho, tree doing well

    Giant sequoia move on schedule in Idaho, tree doing wellBOISE, Idaho (AP) — A massive Idaho tree that grew over more than a century from a seedling sent by a noted naturalist has been uprooted and is poised to travel about two blocks Sunday to a new location.


  • The way we respond to being stared at may reveal how much power we think we have

    The way we respond to being stared at may reveal how much power we think we haveIn a blog post for Psychology Today, Audrey Nelson discusses how continuous eye contact for ten seconds or longer is disconcerting. This doesn't mean that everyone who dislikes eye contact is on the autistic spectrum, though. According to research discussed in another blog post in Psychology Today, avoiding someone's gaze could also be an evolutionary behaviour we have picked up to respond to threats.


  • Polish protesters demand halt to logging in primeval forest

    Polish protesters demand halt to logging in primeval forestHundreds marched in Warsaw on Saturday to protest widespread logging in Europe's last primeval forest, a project undertaken by Poland's conservative government. The ruling Law and Justice party has allowed ...


  • The EPA Quietly Approved Monsanto's New Genetic-Engineering Technology

    The EPA Quietly Approved Monsanto's New Genetic-Engineering TechnologyDvSnf7 dsRNA is an unusual insecticide. You don’t spray it on crops. Instead, you encode instructions for manufacturing it in the DNA of the crop itself. If a pesky western corn rootworm comes munching, the plant’s self-made DvSnf7 dsRNA disrupts a critical rootworm gene and kills the pest.  


  • New form of carbon discovered that is harder than diamond but flexible as rubber

    New form of carbon discovered that is harder than diamond but flexible as rubberCompressed glassy carbon could be used to make better bulletproof vests or new types of electronics.


  • A 'cutting-edge' Confederate death trap inspired today's sub

    A 'cutting-edge' Confederate death trap inspired today's subFrom CNET Magazine: The H.L. Hunley was the first sub to sink an enemy ship. It was also a playbook on how not to design a submarine.


  • The prize-winning tech helping Ghana's farmers to grow

    The prize-winning tech helping Ghana's farmers to growAgyei Douglas is a farmer who grows vegetables near Kumasi in Ghana's central Ashanti region. For farmers, there are also weather forecasts, market prices and agricultural tips all offered as voice messages in local languages such as the Akan dialect Twi.


  • How Much Is Elon Musk Worth? Tesla's Stock Continues To Soar

    How Much Is Elon Musk Worth? Tesla's Stock Continues To SoarTechnology giant Elon Musk is worth billions and his worth is increasing as Tesla stock soars.


  • Evolutionary biologists have been misinterpreting a key point in Darwin’s theory for years

    Evolutionary biologists have been misinterpreting a key point in Darwin’s theory for yearsRichard Prum, Coe Professor at Yale University and author of “The Descent of Man, and...


  • Eclipse chasers blaze trail to Oregon for view of a lifetime

    Eclipse chasers blaze trail to Oregon for view of a lifetimeMADRAS, Ore. (AP) — Just before sunrise, there's typically nothing atop Round Butte but the whistle of the wind and a panoramic view of Oregon's second-highest peak glowing pink in the faint light.


  • Your Genes May Influence Your Risk of Insomnia

    Your Genes May Influence Your Risk of InsomniaPeople who have insomnia may have been told that their sleeping troubles are "all in their head," but a new study shows that this condition is driven not only by psychological factors, but biological ones as well. In the study, researchers in the Netherlands identified seven genes linked with insomnia, meaning there's a biological component to the sleep disorder. "We hope that people will start to realize that insomnia is not 'all in the head' but a biological vulnerability," said study co-author Eus van Someren, a professor of sleep at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience.


  • Watch: SpaceX is launching a reused rocket, hoping to prove spaceflight can get cheaper

    Watch: SpaceX is launching a reused rocket, hoping to prove spaceflight can get cheaperOne of the biggest problems with space travel is that it’s freaking expensive. If humans are ever going to become a spacefaring species, with colonies on the moon and Mars — as big thinkers like physicist Stephen Hawking insist we should — space travel is going to have to get a lot cheaper. "We have to figure out how to improve the cost [of traveling to Mars] by 5 million percent," Elon Musk said last year, announcing his personal dream to establish a human colony on Mars.


  • SpeceX's Falcon 9 vs. Falcon Heavy

    SpeceX's Falcon 9 vs. Falcon HeavyThe Falcon Heavy is seemingly just a Falcon 9 with two Falcon 9 first stages attached to it. Shouldn't it be easy to make it fly?


  • Things About the ‘Star Wars’ Universe That Make No Sense

    Things About the ‘Star Wars’ Universe That Make No SenseThere are lots of things we all love about the 'Star Wars' universe. Even so, there's plenty that makes very little sense.


  • Mysterious Planet 10 could be hiding out beyond Pluto

    Mysterious Planet 10 could be hiding out beyond PlutoMove over, Planet 9. There's a new possible planet lurking out in the solar system and it could be messing with a whole lot of distant space rocks.


  • Scientists honor David Bowie by naming a 100-million-year-old wasp after David Bowie

    Scientists honor David Bowie by naming a 100-million-year-old wasp after David BowieDavid Bowie's memory is being preserved in a pretty unexpected way.  Nearly a year and a half after the "Space Oddity" singer's death, scientists have named a new, 100-million-year-old extinct species of wasps after him. The announcement was made in a paper in the latest edition of the Journal of Hymenoptera Research. SEE ALSO: Costa Rica's president swallowed a wasp during an interview which was totally cool, no big deal whatsoever The wasp is now called Archaeoteleia astropulvis and, in case you can't translate it, "astropulvis" is a Latin translation for "star dust," a tribute to Bowie's famous alter ego "Ziggy Stardust." Entomologists said the name "refers to the ancient source of the atoms that form our planet and its inhabitants and commemorates the late David Bowie alter ego, Ziggy Stardust." The wasp was one of two different species preserved in Burmese amber. They were brought to the National Museum of Natural History by Longfeng Li, a student visiting from Capitol Normal University in Beijing. Both were previously unidentified, Phys.org reported.  You can check out the full study below.  This isn't the first time a species has been named after Bowie, though.  An endangered spider — Heteropoda davidbowie — was named after him a few years back, fitting for the musician who made "The Spiders From Mars" a thing.  WATCH: Guess who was next in line for David Bowie's role in 'Labyrinth'


  • Scientist says the sun is sneezing on Earth

    Scientist says the sun is sneezing on Earth

    The sun at the center of our Solar System is one of the big reasons why we're here today, but it can also be a bit of a nuisance from time to time. Coronal mass ejections — when the sun spews a whole bunch of plasma and energy into space — can seriously mess up human communication infrastructure if they happen to graze Earth. For years, researchers have attempted to forecast and predict CMEs in the hopes that warnings could help prevent damage to electronics and the power grid, and when doing so, they've modeled the huge solar blasts as bubbles moving through space. As it turns out, a CME is more like a sneeze.

    "Up until now, it has been assumed CMEs move like bubbles through space and respond to forces as single objects," Professor Mathew Owens of the University of Reading explains. "We have found they are more like an expanding dust cloud or sneeze, made up of individual plasma parcels all doing their own thing.

    When the solar wind acts on the CME as it moves through space, it causes the shape and behavior of the energy blast to become unpredictable. "Therefore if we want to protect ourselves from solar eruptions, we need to understand more about the solar wind," Owens says.

    This new study, and the suggestion from the research team that solar wind readings be included in the forecasting and prediction of future CMEs, could help scientists more accurately assess the risk that the ejections pose to human technology, and potentially help mitigate the damage they cause.


  • Dogs have been working alongside humans for much longer than we thought

    Dogs have been working alongside humans for much longer than we thoughtIt’s time to rewrite the record on dogs with jobs. We all know humans have long bred canines into all sizes and shapes to do our bidding—even if that’s just sitting in a queen’s sleeve or a celebrity’s purse. But we didn’t know for how long we’d been doing it. Previously, researchers believed that canine…


  • Home Sweet Home: The Best College Degrees for Homeownership

    Home Sweet Home: The Best College Degrees for HomeownershipWhen will you become a homeowner? You might be surprised to know your college degree could be a factor.


  • Here’s Your Guide to the Very Complicated Mythology of the Transformers Universe

    Here’s Your Guide to the Very Complicated Mythology of the Transformers UniverseRefreshing your memory on everything from Energon cubes to to Dinobots.