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  • NASA launches last of its longtime tracking satellites

    NASA launches last of its longtime tracking satellitesNASA has launched the last of its longtime tracking and communication satellites


  • Wear solar specs or make a viewer to safely watch eclipse

    Wear solar specs or make a viewer to safely watch eclipseSolar specs are a must for safe viewing of Monday's total solar eclipse, the first to span U.S. coast to coast in 99 years.


  • Researchers find wreckage of WWII-era USS Indianapolis

    Researchers find wreckage of WWII-era USS IndianapolisWASHINGTON (AP) — Civilian researchers say they have located the wreck of the USS Indianapolis, the World War II heavy cruiser that played a critical role in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima before being struck by Japanese torpedoes.


  • Mexico City fishermen fight to save Aztec floating gardens

    Mexico City fishermen fight to save Aztec floating gardensRoberto Altamirano has the lake to himself as he casts his glistening net onto the still water in a perfect circle, lets it sink, then slowly pulls it in. It comes back bearing a large haul of tilapia and carp -- and that is exactly the problem. Altamirano is one of just 20 or so fishermen who remain in the floating gardens of Xochimilco, an idyllic network of lakes, canals and artificial islands improbably tucked into the urban sprawl of Mexico City.


  • An error made in 1925 led to a crisis in modern science—now researchers are joining to fix it

    An error made in 1925 led to a crisis in modern science—now researchers are joining to fix itIn 1908, the Guinness brewer William Gosset published a revolutionary paper titled “The Probable Error of the Mean.” Gosset, who published under the pseudonym “Student” at his employer’s request, often conducted experiments on the impact of new ingredients on the composition of his beer—such as the brew’s sugar levels. Constrained by the fact that he…


  • Asian carp found near Lake Michigan got past barriers

    Asian carp found near Lake Michigan got past barriersTRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — An adult Asian carp found in a Chicago waterway near Lake Michigan this summer began its life far downstream and apparently got around a series of electric barriers intended to keep the invasive species out of the Great Lakes, officials said Friday.


  • Jeremy Hunt mocked for trying to school Stephen Hawking on Twitter

    Jeremy Hunt mocked for trying to school Stephen Hawking on TwitterJeremy Hunt has taken on famous scientist Stephen Hawking, firing off tweets defending himself against the professor's earlier criticism. Mr Hunt has been mocked and questioned by social media users, who said he is "trying to school the world's most famous scientist on numbers and evidence." In tweets Mr Hunt said: "Stephen Hawking is brilliant physicist but wrong on lack of evidence 4 weekend effect. 2015 Fremantle study most comprehensive ever ... And whatever entrenched opposition, no responsible health sec could ignore it if you want NHS 2 be safest health service in world as I do." Stephen Hawking is brilliant physicist but wrong on lack of evidence 4 weekend effect.2015 Fremantle study most comprehensive ever 1/2— Jeremy Hunt (@Jeremy_Hunt) August 18, 2017 The world-renowned scientist had attacked Health Secretary for "cherry-picking" favourable evidence while suppressing contradictory research in order to suit his argument. The 75-year-old, who was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 1962, said he "would not be here today if it were not for the service" and accused the Conservatives of putting the NHS in crisis. Angela Rayner said she was firmly on the side of the physicist, writing: "Jeremy Hunt telling Stephen Hawking he doesn't know how to interpret evidence on NHS statistics. I trust Stephen." Clive Lewis joined in, tweeting: "Well,1 gave us complex theories on blackholes & alt universes.The other left a blackhole where the NHS was & covered his back with alt facts". Well,1 gave us complex theories on blackholes & alt universes.The other left a blackhole where the NHS was & covered his back with alt facts https://t.co/NNuHzWCIBS— Clive Lewis (@labourlewis) August 19, 2017 Jeremy Hunt telling Stephen Hawking he doesn't know how to interpret evidence on NHS statistics. I trust Stephen. https://t.co/fngfbKW4wd— Angela Rayner MP (@AngelaRayner) August 19, 2017 The Health Secretary was condemned on social media for his tweets. Jeremy Hunt takes on Stephen Hawking on twitter about interpretation of an academic study *ducks* https://t.co/Ecm42kTJBU— Bobby Pratap (@BobbyPratapMH) August 18, 2017 Worst health secretary ever tries to school the world's most famous scientist on numbers and evidence. Soooo 2017 https://t.co/DKprPfbLcu— Dean Burnett (@garwboy) August 19, 2017 One user wrote: "Really?? You take issue with one of the foremost scientific minds of the century? And a lifelong adult NHS patient to boot. What arrogance." Another said: "Yeah, Hawking's always been terrible at analysing data and understanding complex issues so I'm convinced." And another pointed out: "When the Health Secretary thinks he knows more about science than Stephen Hawking". Stephen Hawking: Labour cannot win election under Corbyn 00:38    


  • Scientists remotely hacked a brain, controlling body movements

    Scientists remotely hacked a brain, controlling body movements

    Imagine someone remotely controlling your brain, forcing your body's central processing organ to send messages to your muscles that you didn't authorize. It's an incredibly scary thought, but scientists have managed to accomplish this science fiction nightmare for real, albeit on a much small scale, and they were even able to prompt their test subject to run, freeze in place, or even completely lose control over their limbs. Thankfully, the research will be used for good rather than evil... for now.

    The effort, led by physics professor Arnd Pralle, PhD, of the University at Buffalo College of Arts and Sciences, focused on a technique called "magneto-thermal stimulation." It's not exactly a simple process — it requires the implantation of specially built DNA strands and nanoparticles which attach to specific neurons — but once the minimally invasive procedure is over, the brain can be remotely controlled via an alternating magnetic field. When those magnetic inputs are applied, the particles heat up, causing the neurons to fire.

    The study, which was published in the most recent edition of the journal eLife, includes experiments where were performed on mice. Using the new technique, the researchers were able to control the movement of the animals, causing them to freeze, lock up their limbs, turn around, or even run.

    Despite only being tested on mice, the research could have far-reaching implications in the realm of brain research. The holy grail for dreamers like Elon Musk is that we'll one day be able to tweak our brains to eliminate mood disorders and make us more perfect creatures. This groundbreaking research could very well be an important step towards that future.


  • 19 celestial school supplies for all the space cadets out there

    19 celestial school supplies for all the space cadets out thereAttention all stargazers and wannabe astronauts alike! It’s back-to-school season, and that means it’s time to come inside and get that homework…


  • Who are the white nationalists and Antifa: Part 1

    Who are the white nationalists and Antifa: Part 1For the past six months, ABC News' "20/20" traveled the country tracking political violence and following extremists.


  • This Enigmatic Dinosaur May Be the Missing Link in an Evolution Mystery

    This Enigmatic Dinosaur May Be the Missing Link in an Evolution MysteryA bizarre-looking dinosaur discovered by a young boy in Chile may be the missing link showing how members of one major dinosaur lineage evolved into a completely new dinosaur group, a new study finds. Researchers in the United Kingdom say the species, dubbed Chilesaurus diegosuarezi, explains how some theropods, mostly meat-eating, bipedal dinosaurs, evolved into the herbivorous, long-necked ornithischians. Previously, it was unclear how the "ornithischian group just suddenly appeared and became this well-adapted herbivorous group," said the study's co-lead researcher, Matthew Baron, a doctoral student of paleontology at the University of Cambridge in England.


  • Special eclipse glasses selling out quickly

    Special eclipse glasses selling out quicklySALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Eclipse mania is building and so is demand for the glasses that make it safe to view the first total solar eclipse to cross the U.S. in 99 years.


  • How the Solar Eclipse Could Help Us Solve a Mystery About the Sun

    How the Solar Eclipse Could Help Us Solve a Mystery About the SunScientists may uncover the secrets of the corona during the total eclipse


  • White nationalist Richard Spencer, Antifa member Lacy MacAuley confront each other: Part 6

    White nationalist Richard Spencer, Antifa member Lacy MacAuley confront each other: Part 6Spencer blames Antifa for most of the violence between the groups, while MacAuley refused to condemn that Spencer was punched in the face.


  • What a Weather Channel Meteorologist Wants You to Know About the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

    What a Weather Channel Meteorologist Wants You to Know About the 2017 Total Solar EclipseWhat a Weather Channel Meteorologist Wants You to Know About the Eclipse


  • Get your Sagan on with these 49 awe-inspiring photos of the final frontier

    Get your Sagan on with these 49 awe-inspiring photos of the final frontierFew things instill a sense of wonder quite like the final frontier. The best space photos show off the beauty of Earth, our solar system, and the far corners of the universe. Here are our current favorites.


  • Tribes hope for renewal in solar eclipse; not all will watch

    Tribes hope for renewal in solar eclipse; not all will watchFLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — While much of the country gawks at the solar eclipse, Bobbieann Baldwin will be inside with her children, shades drawn.


  • The Weirdest Marvel Character Origins

    The Weirdest Marvel Character OriginsComic characters are known for sometimes having cliché origins -- lab accidents, childhood traumas, etc. -- but these 5 characters easily steer clear of that.


  • 18 space suits from science fiction, from worst to best

    18 space suits from science fiction, from worst to bestSpace suits are cool — and complicated. Unsurprisingly, science fiction writers, movie directors, and prop-makers also love space suits — you’ll find them everywhere from Robert A. Heinlein’s novel Have Space Suit — Will Travel, to the latest Alien movie. There’s no such thing as an “ideal” space suit, because you need specific features for different environments.